Louisiana Tech University engineering professor receives state professionalism award

January 22, 2016

RUSTON, La. - Dr. Beth Hegab, lecturer for industrial engineering and program coordinator for engineering and technology management at Louisiana Tech University, has received the 2016 Engineering Faculty Professionalism Award from the Louisiana Engineering Foundation.

The award was presented to Hegab at the 20th Joint Engineering Societies Conference held recently in Lafayette, Louisiana. Hegab earned the honor for her leadership in helping develop online options for engineers seeking graduate degrees.

Hegab has helped pioneer online education at Louisiana Tech, helping make the master's degree program in engineering and technology management available online, and working to increase the size of the program by 450 percent. She has also helped develop Louisiana Tech's online degree program in engineering with a concentration in industrial engineering and been instrumental in developing online Six Sigma Green Belt and Six Sigma Black Belt certification programs that are offered at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

Hegab has been a member of the industrial engineering faculty in Louisiana Tech's College of Engineering and Science for 12 years, teaching at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. She has been the program coordinator for the engineering and technology management program for six years, and has been recognized with the College of Engineering and Science Outstanding Teaching award and Outstanding Service awards. Hegab also serves as the advisor for the Alpha Pi Mu honor society.

Hegab earned a doctorate in business administration and an M.B.A. from Louisiana Tech. She also holds a master's degree in industrial engineering and a bachelor of industrial engineering degree from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Hegab is a registered professional engineer and has served as the Math Counts coach for A.E. Phillips Laboratory School for the past eight years. Under her guidance, the A.E. Phillips team was second in the state in 2015 and one of the team members competed at the national competition.

RUSTON, La. - Dr. Beth Hegab, lecturer for industrial engineering and program coordinator for engineering and technology management at Louisiana Tech University, has received the 2016 Engineering Faculty Professionalism Award from the Louisiana Engineering Foundation.

The award was presented to Hegab at the 20th Joint Engineering Societies Conference held recently in Lafayette, Louisiana. Hegab earned the honor for her leadership in helping develop online options for engineers seeking graduate degrees.

Hegab has helped pioneer online education at Louisiana Tech, helping make the master's degree program in engineering and technology management available online, and working to increase the size of the program by 450 percent. She has also helped develop Louisiana Tech's online degree program in engineering with a concentration in industrial engineering and been instrumental in developing online Six Sigma Green Belt and Six Sigma Black Belt certification programs that are offered at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

Hegab has been a member of the industrial engineering faculty in Louisiana Tech's College of Engineering and Science for 12 years, teaching at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. She has been the program coordinator for the engineering and technology management program for six years, and has been recognized with the College of Engineering and Science Outstanding Teaching award and Outstanding Service awards. Hegab also serves as the advisor for the Alpha Pi Mu honor society.

Hegab earned a doctorate in business administration and an M.B.A. from Louisiana Tech. She also holds a master's degree in industrial engineering and a bachelor of industrial engineering degree from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Hegab is a registered professional engineer and has served as the Math Counts coach for A.E. Phillips Laboratory School for the past eight years. Under her guidance, the A.E. Phillips team was second in the state in 2015 and one of the team members competed at the national competition.

The Louisiana Engineering Foundation was founded in 1978 by a group of Louisiana professional engineers, members of the Louisiana Engineering Society and other professional engineering groups. Its purpose was, and continues to be, the promotion of activities to support and strengthen the profession of engineering. The stated goals of the Foundation are to promote charitable, educational and scientific objectives.
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The Louisiana Engineering Foundation was founded in 1978 by a group of Louisiana professional engineers, members of the Louisiana Engineering Society and other professional engineering groups. Its purpose was, and continues to be, the promotion of activities to support and strengthen the profession of engineering. The stated goals of the Foundation are to promote charitable, educational and scientific objectives.

Louisiana Tech University

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