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A heart-healthy protein from bran of cereal crop

January 22, 2020

Foxtail millet is an annual grass grown widely as a cereal crop in parts of India, China and Southeast Asia. Milling the grain removes the hard outer layer, or bran, from the rest of the seed. Now, researchers have identified a protein in this bran that can help stave off atherosclerosis in mice genetically prone to the disease. They report their results in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Atherosclerosis, or narrowing of the arteries because of plaque buildup, is the leading cause of heart disease and stroke. Plaques form when immune cells called monocytes take up oxidized low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (ox-LDL) in the artery wall. These cells then secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines, causing aortic smooth muscle cells to migrate to the site. Eventually, a plaque made up of cholesterol, cells and other substances forms. Drugs called statins can treat atherosclerosis by lowering LDL levels, but some people suffer from side effects. Zhuoyu Li and colleagues previously identified a protein in foxtail millet bran that inhibits the migration of colon cancer cells. They wondered if the protein, called foxtail millet bran peroxidase (FMBP), could also help prevent atherosclerosis.

To find out, the researchers treated human aortic smooth muscle cells and monocytes in petri dishes with FMBP. The millet protein reduced the uptake of lipids by both cell types and reduced the migration of smooth muscle cells. In monocytes, FMBP treatment blocked the expression of two key proteins involved in atherosclerosis. Next, the team fed mice that were genetically predisposed to atherosclerosis a high-fat diet. Mice that were then treated with either FMBP or a statin had far fewer plaques than untreated mice. The FMBP-treated mice also had elevated blood levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), the "good cholesterol." Based on these results, FMBP is a natural product with great potential in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis, the researchers say.
-end-
The authors acknowledge funding from the National Natural Science Foundation of China, "1331 Project" Key Innovation Center and Team of Shanxi Province, Shanxi Province Science Foundation for Key Projects, Shanxi Key Laboratory for Research and Development of Regional Plants, Collaborative Innovation Center of Quality and Efficiency of Loess Plateau Edible Fungi in Shanxi, Higher Education Institution Project of Shanxi Province and the Ecological Remediation of Soil Pollution Disciplines Group.

The paper's abstract will be available on January 22 at 8 a.m. Eastern time here: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.jafc.9b06963

For more research news, journalists and public information officers are encouraged to apply for complimentary press registration for the ACS Spring 2020 National Meeting & Exposition in Philadelphia.

The American Chemical Society (ACS) is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. ACS' mission is to advance the broader chemistry enterprise and its practitioners for the benefit of Earth and its people. The Society is a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related information and research through its multiple research solutions, peer-reviewed journals, scientific conferences, eBooks and weekly news periodical Chemical & Engineering News. ACS journals are among the most cited, most trusted and most read within the scientific literature; however, ACS itself does not conduct chemical research. As a specialist in scientific information solutions (including SciFinder® and STN®), its CAS division powers global research, discovery and innovation. ACS' main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

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