Stem cells could be used for cardiac repair

January 23, 2008

Scientific studies on the use of stem cells for cardiac repair will be examined during the Winter Research Meeting of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology which starts today in Garmish-Partenkirchen, Germany. Findings in experiments conducted with rodent engineered heart tissue (EHT) in Germany, indicate the great potential of pluripotent stem cells for use in cardiac repair. Over one hundred top cardiologists from all over Europe, Japan and the United States are attending the annual event.

New data which improves our understanding of the importance of diastolic heart failure will be presented and discussed at the convention. Also on the agenda: cardiac remodelling and genetic pathways in cardiovascular development.

"The major goal for this meeting is to bring together the very best scientists from Europe and around the world working on basic and translational science in the field of heart failure ... in order to encourage intense and robust scientific exchanges and discussion relating to the latest data and advances" stated Prof Kenneth Dickstein, President of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology in his welcome address. "The active involvement of junior investigators is also encouraged" explained Prof Dickstein.

The Winter Meeting is sponsored exclusively by the Heart Failure Association and held in collaboration with the ESC Working Groups on Myocardial Function, Cellular Biology of the Heart, Cardiac Cellular Electrophysiology, Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Drug Therapy, EUGeneHeart and the Council for Basic Cardiovascular Science.

The Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology aims to improve quality of life and longevity, through better prevention, diagnosis and treatment of heart failure, including the establishment of networks for its management, education and research.
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The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) represents more than 50,000 cardiology professionals across Europe and the Mediterranean. Its mission is to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease in Europe. Visit our website: www.escardio.org.

European Society of Cardiology

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