Nav: Home

Advances in 3D and organoid cell culture

January 23, 2019

A new collection of reviews and original research articles in SLAS Technology illustrate how new technologies and advanced cell culture are accelerating basic research, drug discovery and drug development.

When cultured under 3D conditions, human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide optimized systems that more accurately reflect disease-related target mutations, compound pharmacology and toxicology.

The review articles in this collection feature a comprehensive, two-part, overview of the use of 3D culture, including spheroids and organoids, when growing human iPSCs for use in disease modeling, compound screening and lead optimization. The research articles address the high-throughput screening of glioblastoma oncospheres in drug, a microfluidic approach to optimization of culture conditions for human iPSCs differentiation, and novel hydrogels for use in microlayered tissue constructs.

Collectively, this special collection, published in the February 2019 issue of SLAS Technology, illustrates how the human iPS cells and 3D cell culture technology provide powerful approaches to the development of novel and more effective therapies.
  • Editorial Introduction: Convergence of Three-Dimensional Cell Culture and Human iPS Cells: Improving Clinical Relevance in Drug Discovery by Guest Editor Richard M. Eglen, Ph.D., Corning Life Sciences (Tewksbury, MA, USA)

  • Review Article: Human iPS Cell-Derived Patient Tissues and 3D Cell Culture Part 1: Target Identification and Lead Optimization

  • Review Article: Human iPS Cell-Derived Patient Tissues and 3D Cell Culture Part 2: Spheroids, Organoids and Disease Modeling

  • Original Research: Mutation Profiles in Glioblastoma 3D Oncospheres Modulate Drug Efficacy

  • Original Research: Full Factorial Microfluidic Designs and Devices for Parallelizing Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Differentiation

  • Original Research: A Single-Step Self-Assembly Approach for the Fabrication of Aligned and Multilayered Three-Dimensional Tissue Constructs Using Multidomain Peptide Hydrogel
-end-
Free access to the SLAS Technology special collection on Advances in 3D and Organoid Cell Culture at http://journals.sagepub.com/toc/jlad/24/1 is sponsored by Corning Life Sciences. For more information about SLAS and its journals, visit http://www.slas.org/journals. For more information about Corning Life Sciences, visit http://www.corning.com/lifesciences.

PDFs of these articles are available to credentialed media outlets upon request. Contact jhronek@slas.org.

About our Society and Journals

SLAS (Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening) is an international community of nearly 20,000 professionals and students dedicated to life sciences discovery and technology. The SLAS mission is to bring together researchers in academia, industry and government to advance life sciences discovery and technology via education, knowledge exchange and global community building.

SLAS DISCOVERY:2016 Impact Factor 2.355. Editor-in-Chief Robert M. Campbell, Ph.D., Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN (USA). SLAS Discovery (Advancing Life Sciences R&D) was previously published (1996-2016) as the Journal of Biomolecular Screening (JBS).

SLAS TECHNOLOGY: 2016 Impact Factor 2.632. Editor-in-Chief Edward Kai-Hua Chow, Ph.D., National University of Singapore (Singapore). SLAS Technology (Translating Life Sciences Innovation) was previously published (1996-2016) as the Journal of Laboratory Automation (JALA).

Follow SLAS on Twitter at @SLAS_Org.

Follow SLAS on Facebook at SocietyforLaboratoryAutomationandScreening.

Follow SLAS on YouTube at SLASvideo.

Follow SLAS Americas on LinkedIn at Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening (SLAS Americas).

Follow SLAS Europe on LinkedIn at Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening Europe (SLAS Europe).

SLAS (Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening)

Related Drug Discovery Articles:

New cell models for ocular drug discovery
Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland have developed two new cell models that can open up new avenues for ocular drug discovery.
Machine learning's next frontier: Epigenetic drug discovery
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have developed a machine-learning algorithm that gleans information from microscope images -- allowing for high-throughput epigenetic drug screens that could unlock new treatments for cancer, heart disease, mental illness and more.
Discovery of how colorectal cancer drug works will help more patients
Some colorectal cancer patients with a certain gene mutation benefit from a chemotherapy drug called cetuximab, although the mechanism of how this drug worked was unknown.
Speeding up the drug discovery process to help patients
An international research team is perfecting a method to predict the potential clinical implications of new drugs before clinical trials even start.
Learning from nature's bounty: New libraries for drug discovery
Natural products make some of our most potent medicines, among which macrocycles with their large carbon-rich ring systems are one class.
Bioluminescence sensors make new approaches to drug discovery possible
Canadian and Brazilian researchers describe the use of 13 molecular tools for measuring different intracellular signaling pathways and evaluating the action mechanisms of new drugs.
Light-based production of drug-discovery molecules
EPFL chemists have developed a light-based chemical method for cheap and simple production of chemical molecules used in drug discovery, such as muscle relaxants and antimicrobials.
New drug discovery could halt spread of brain cancer
A team of researchers at Virginia Tech may have found a solution to stopping the spread of glioblastoma with a new drug and cancer treatment method.
Arming drug hunters, chemists design new reaction for drug discovery
Colorado State University organic chemists have forged a powerful new tool for drug hunters -- a simple, elegantly designed chemical reaction that could fling open an underexplored wing of biologically relevant chemistry.
Accelerating drug discovery by crowdsourcing confidential data
Leveraging modern cryptographic and machine learning tools, researchers seeking to accelerate drug discovery have developed a way for multiple pharmaceutical companies and laboratories to collaborate without revealing confidential data.
More Drug Discovery News and Drug Discovery Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Accessing Better Health
Essential health care is a right, not a privilege ... or is it? This hour, TED speakers explore how we can give everyone access to a healthier way of life, despite who you are or where you live. Guests include physician Raj Panjabi, former NYC health commissioner Mary Bassett, researcher Michael Hendryx, and neuroscientist Rachel Wurzman.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#544 Prosperity Without Growth
The societies we live in are organised around growth, objects, and driving forward a constantly expanding economy as benchmarks of success and prosperity. But this growing consumption at all costs is at odds with our understanding of what our planet can support. How do we lower the environmental impact of economic activity? How do we redefine success and prosperity separate from GDP, which politicians and governments have focused on for decades? We speak with ecological economist Tim Jackson, Professor of Sustainable Development at the University of Surrey, Director of the Centre for the Understanding of Sustainable Propserity, and author of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

An Announcement from Radiolab