Topical anaesthetic spray delays ejaculation by five times as long says new study

January 24, 2007

Patients with premature ejaculation who used a topical anaesthetic spray were able to delay ejaculation for five times as long, according to a study in the February issue of the urology journal BJU International.

Researchers from the UK and Netherlands studied 54 men with premature ejaculation, randomly assigning them to a treatment and control group. Both groups reported that without any therapy they normally ejaculated an average of one minute after vaginal penetration.

"The men who were prescribed the TEMPE spray, which delivers a combination of lidocaine and prilocaine, managed to delay ejaculation by just under an extra four minutes after using the product" reports Professor Wallace Dinsmore from the Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast.

"Meanwhile the control group, who were prescribed a placebo (dummy) spray, increased their penetration to ejaculation time by just over 40 seconds.

"Overall, the TEMPE spray was 2.4 times more effective than the placebo."

The study focussed on heterosexual couples who had been in a stable monogamous relationship for at least three months and were willing to attempt sexual intercourse on at least seven occasions during the ten-week study period.

Recruited from six hospitals and medical centres across the UK - Sheffield, Manchester, Durham, Plymouth, Belfast and London - and one in The Hague, the men were aged from 18 to 75, with an average age of 39.

Time since diagnosis ranged from seven months to just under 35 years, with an average of nine and a half years.

The men in the TEMPE group (Topical Eutectic Mixture for Premature Ejaculation) administered three metered sprays of the local anaesthetic preparation to the glans of their penis 15 minutes before intercourse. This delivered a total of 22.5mg of lidocaine and 7.5mg of prilocaine.

The placebo group were issued with an identical container that delivered a spray without any active ingredients. Both groups were advised not to use the spray more than once in any 24-hour period to avoid possible bias resulting from too frequent ejaculation.

Participants were also issued with a stopwatch so that they, or their partner, could measure the time lapse between penetration and ejaculation.

20 TEMPE users and 23 placebo users completed the study and 83 per cent of all users found the spray easy to use.

The majority of the TEMPE users and their partners tolerated the spray well. Three men reported numbness in their penis, one said he was unable to get an erection and one partner reported a mild burning sensation each time the spray was used, but continued with the treatment.

No adverse effects were found during patient safety checks, which included vital signs, physical findings, electrocardiograms, haematology, biochemistry and urine analysis.

"At the moment, only a small number of men with premature ejaculation seek or receive treatment from a healthcare professional and the lack of effective pharmacological treatment is a contributory factor" concludes co-author Dr Michael Wyllie from Plethora Solutions Ltd, which manufactures the TEMPE spray.

"The encouraging data from this phase two study suggests that TEMPE has the potential to offer a convenient, novel treatment for men with premature ejaculation and might be useful as a first-line treatment for the condition."
-end-
Notes to editors



Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Related Placebo Articles from Brightsurf:

Effect of fluvoxamine vs placebo on clinical deterioration in outpatients with symptomatic COVID-19
This randomized trial compares the effects of fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor with immunomodulatory effects, versus placebo on a composite of dyspnea or pneumonia and oxygen desaturation among adult outpatients with polymerase chain reaction-confirmed mild COVID-19 illness.

Hydroxychloroquine no more effective than placebo in preventing COVID-19
Clinical trial with COVID-19 testing of participants shows health care workers in contact with coronavirus patients who took hydroxychloroquine each day did not reduce their rate of infection.

Compared to placebo, vitamin D has no benefit for severe asthma attacks
Contrary to earlier observational results, vitamin D supplements do not prevent severe asthma attacks in at-risk children, according to the first placebo-controlled clinical trial to test this relationship.

UMN trial shows hydroxychloroquine has no benefit over placebo in preventing COVID-19
Today, University of Minnesota Medical School researchers published the results from the first randomized clinical trial testing hydroxychloroquine for the post-exposure prevention of COVID-19.

The placebo effect and psychedelic drugs: tripping on nothing?
A new study from McGill suggests that, in the right context, some people may experience psychedelic-like effects from placebos alone.

Methotrexate reduces joint damage progression over placebo in erosive hand OA
According to new research findings presented at the 2019 ACR/ARP Annual Meeting, methotrexate did not demonstrate superior efficacy over placebo for pain relief and function evolution at three and 12 months in patients with erosive hand osteoarthritis, but did significantly reduce the progression of joint damage over placebo and seems to facilitate bone remodeling in these patients.

Botulinum toxin reduces chronic migraine attacks, compared to placebo
A growing body of evidence supports the effectiveness of botulinum toxin injections in reducing the frequency of chronic migraine headaches, concludes an updated review and analysis in the January issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

Opioids vs. placebo, nonopioid alternatives for chronic noncancer pain
An estimated 50 million adults in the United States were living with chronic noncancer pain in 2016 and many of them were prescribed opioid medications, even though a clinical benefit is uncertain.

Probiotic no better than placebo for acute gastroenteritis in children
While probiotics are often used to treat acute gastroenteritis (also known as infectious diarrhea) in children, the latest evidence shows no significant differences in outcomes, compared to a placebo.

Most common shoulder operation is no more beneficial than placebo surgery
In a landmark study published this week in the BMJ, Finnish researchers show that one of the most common surgical procedures in the Western world is probably unnecessary.

Read More: Placebo News and Placebo Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.