Better strategies for osteoporosis prevention and therapy

January 24, 2007

This year's Best Paper Award for outstanding work published in the Springer journal Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry (ABC) goes to the German chemist Eberhard Denk (31). Denk's paper "Labeling the human skeleton with 41Ca to assess changes in bone calcium metabolism" discusses a technique which could be used to develop better strategies for osteoporosis prevention. Denk conducted his work at ETH Zurich as part of a multinational, interdisciplinary EU-funded project (OSTEODIET) led by Thomas Walczyk at the Laboratory of Human Nutrition ETHZ. The Award is accompanied by EUR 1,000, sponsored by Springer. In addition, the winning paper will receive special prominence on an ABC cover.

The paper evaluates a novel isotopic technique for osteoporosis research. By labeling calcium in the bone matrix isotopically, changes in bone metabolism could be detected directly via changes in urinary excretion of the tracer. This became possible by using 41Ca, an extremely long-living radioisotope which is virtually non-existent in nature and which can be detected at the ultra-trace level using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS).

The entire methodology has the potential to become a major breakthrough in bone research. Changes in bone calcium metabolism can be detected both directly and on a short-term scale which to date cannot be achieved to the same extent by any other technique. The new technique could potentially be used to evaluate the influence of diet, drugs and life-style on Ca metabolism in bone and to develop better strategies for osteoporosis prevention and treatment. Eberhard Denk continued his work at ETH in Zurich as a post-doctorate scientist, further developing the 41Ca methodology.

Klaus G. Heumann, Editor of ABC, said, "Denk's pioneering work is truly new and innovative, meeting ABC's high standards for excellent research publications. The paper presents interdisciplinary and innovative research results which combine the ultra-trace methods of RIMS and AMS with extremely important biomedical applications."
-end-
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry is an international journal dealing with all aspects of analytical and bioanalytical sciences. The journal covers all fields of pure and applied analytical chemistry and bioanalysis, including topics at their interfaces with life and health sciences, engineering and materials sciences, environmental science, earth sciences, and others. The Best Paper Award was created to encourage exceptional, young scientists in establishing their research careers. This Award is presented annually to a scientist up to 40 years of age who is the lead author of a paper published in ABC during the calendar year.

Springer (www.springer.com) is the second-largest publisher worldwide in the science, technology, and medicine (STM) sector. Springer is part of Springer Science+Business Media, one of the world's leading suppliers of scientific and specialist literature.

The article is freely available online on SpringerLink at http://springerlink.com/content/j4n42m0372r1004k/?p=bbbc3a302c23474389cd8f64f3a4bd16&pi=5 or can be supplied as a pdf.

Springer

Related Bone Articles from Brightsurf:

Perforated bone tissue from too little sugar
Bone marrow cancer is currently an incurable disease that affects about 400 people in Norway every year.

Buzzing to rebuild broken bone
Healing broken bones could get easier with a device that provides both a scaffold for the bone to grow on and electrical stimulation to urge it forward, UConn engineers report.

Self-healing bone cement
Material scientists at the University of Jena have developed a bone replacement based on calcium phosphate cement and reinforced with carbon fibers.

Down to the bone: Understanding how bone-dissolving cells are generated
Bone-dissolving cells called osteoclasts are derived from a type of immune cells called macrophages.

Bone particles in blood
A researcher at The University of Texas at Arlington has found that blood vessels within bone marrow may progressively convert into bone with advancing age.

'Bone in a dish' opens new window on cancer initiation, metastasis, bone healing
Researchers in Oregon have engineered a material that replicates human bone tissue with an unprecedented level of precision, from its microscopic crystal structure to its biological activity.

UCI team pioneers cancer treatment that targets bone metastases while sparing bone
University of California, Irvine researchers have developed and tested on mice a therapeutic treatment that uses engineered stem cells to target and kill cancer bone metastases while preserving the bone.

Replicating fetal bone growth process could help heal large bone defects
To treat large gaps in long bones, like the femur, which often can result in amputation, researched developed a process in a rodent model that partially recreates the bone growth process that occurs before birth.

3D-printed 'hyperelastic bone' may help generate new bone for skull reconstruction
Defects of the skull and facial bones can pose difficult challenges for plastic and reconstructive surgeons.

From foam to bone: Plant cellulose can pave the way for healthy bone implants
Researchers from the University of British Columbia and McMaster University have developed what could be the bone implant material of the future: an airy, foamlike substance from plant cellulose that can be injected into the body and provide scaffolding for the growth of new bone.

Read More: Bone News and Bone Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.