Nav: Home

Follow-up phone calls by pharmacists help patients after hospital discharge

January 24, 2019

A new British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology study illustrates the benefits of having clinical pharmacists follow up, by telephone, with patients at risk of having medication-related issues after hospital discharge. The aim is to help patients manage their medications effectively.

In the study, patients who received such pharmacist-led, post-discharge telephone follow-up were matched with patients in a control group. All patients in the study had been prescribed multiple medicines for the management of their medical conditions.

The intervention reduced 30- and 90-day hospital readmission rates by 9.9 percent and 15.2 percent, respectively, compared with controls. The intervention also had positive effects on time to hospital readmission, length of hospital stay upon readmission, healthcare costs, patient beliefs about medicines, patient adherence to their medications, and patient satisfaction.

"Many patients have difficulty in managing their medicines after discharge from hospital. Telephone follow-up allowed clinical pharmacists to give tailored support to patients according to their individual needs," said senior author Prof. James McElnay, of Queen's University Belfast, in the UK. "This simple intervention had very positive outcomes and was welcomed by patients. We are working to introduce this new approach into routine practice across the hospital service."
-end-


Wiley

Related Hospital Readmission Articles:

Study finds that Community Treatment Orders do not reduce hospital readmission rates or stays
CTOs are a legal order for compulsory community monitoring and treatment of people discharged from psychiatric hospitals and were introduced in the Mental Health Act amendment in 2007.
Research reveals best hospital-based methods for reducing readmission rates
Research led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York has revealed the most effective hospital-based methods for reducing readmission rates.
Readmission risk increases for elderly patients with geriatric-specific characteristics
Researchers have examined new geriatric-specific characteristics that appear to raise the risk of elderly surgical patients having an unplanned hospital readmission within a month of initially leaving the hospital.
Hospital readmission policy did not increase patients' mortality risk
The Obamacare program intended to reduce the risk of patients being readmitted after hospitalizations for heart attacks, heart failure, and pneumonia has not caused an increase in mortality risk for patients in emergency departments or observational units, according to a new report.
Study challenges concerns over hospital readmission reduction practices
A UT Southwestern study is challenging concerns that a federal health policy enacted in 2012 to reduce hospital readmissions leaves patients more vulnerable.
Study suggests new computer analytics may solve the hospital readmission puzzle
A University of Maryland School of Medicine study suggests that a novel machine learning model developed at the University of Maryland Medical System, called the Baltimore score (B score), may help hospitals better predict which discharged patients are likely to be readmitted.
Readmission penalties for safety net hospitals drop under new rules
Readmission penalties against hospitals providing care to socioeconomically disadvantaged patients have dropped 14 percentage points under new rules adopted in 2019 that more equitably account for low-income populations being served, according to a new analysis led by UT Southwestern Medical Center and Harvard researchers.
Low mobility predicts hospital readmission in older heart attack patients
Close to 20% of elderly adults who have suffered a heart attack will be readmitted to the hospital within 30 days.
Social risk factors and readmission penalties
New research shows that US safety net hospitals could benefit substantially from a new model that accounts for social risk factors like poverty and living in a disadvantaged neighborhood in determining how the federal government penalizes hospitals financially for their readmission rates.
Higher hospital readmission rates for cardiac patients in Northern vs. Southern Ontario: Importance
Patients hospitalized with heart attacks, heart failure, atrial fibrillation or stroke in Northern Ontario, Canada, were more likely to be readmitted to the hospital and repeatedly hospitalized after discharge than those living in Southern Ontario.
More Hospital Readmission News and Hospital Readmission Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: Reinvention
Change is hard, but it's also an opportunity to discover and reimagine what you thought you knew. From our economy, to music, to even ourselves–this hour TED speakers explore the power of reinvention. Guests include OK Go lead singer Damian Kulash Jr., former college gymnastics coach Valorie Kondos Field, Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs, and entrepreneur Nick Hanauer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 6: Strange Times
Covid has disrupted the most basic routines of our days and nights. But in the middle of a conversation about how to fight the virus, we find a place impervious to the stalled plans and frenetic demands of the outside world. It's a very different kind of front line, where urgent work means moving slow, and time is marked out in tiny pre-planned steps. Then, on a walk through the woods, we consider how the tempo of our lives affects our minds and discover how the beats of biology shape our bodies. This episode was produced with help from Molly Webster and Tracie Hunte. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.