Nav: Home

Expanding point-of-care disease diagnostics with ultrasound (video)

January 25, 2017

Fast, accurate and inexpensive medical tests in a doctor's office are only possible for some conditions. To create new in-office diagnostics for additional diseases, researchers report in the journal ACS Nano a new technique that uses ultrasound to concentrate fluorescently labeled disease biomarkers otherwise impossible to detect with current equipment in an office setting. The markers' signal could someday be analyzed via a smartphone app.

Ultrasound is a safe, noninvasive, inexpensive and portable technique best known for monitoring pregnancies. But these high-frequency acoustic waves can also be used to gently handle blood components, cells and protein crystals at the microscopic level. With an eye toward point-of-care diagnostic applications, Tony Huang, Zhangming Mao and colleagues wanted to harness these sound waves to help detect even smaller particles and biomarkers for diseases such as cancer that often require special laboratory equipment to detect.

The researchers developed an acoustofluidic chip that, though vibrations, can form a streaming vortex inside a tiny glass capillary tube using a minimal amount of energy. Testing showed that the vortex could force nanoparticles ranging in diameter from 80 to 500 nanometers to swirl into the center of the capillary. The nanoparticles captured biomarkers labeled with a fluorescent tag, concentrating them in the capillary to boost their signal. This increased brightness could make the signal readable with a smartphone camera.
-end-
The authors acknowledge funding from the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation.

Watch the Headline Science video here explaining the diagnostic technique.

The abstract that accompanies this study is available here.

The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With nearly 157,000 members, ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. ACS does not conduct research, but publishes and publicizes peer-reviewed scientific studies. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

To automatically receive news releases from the American Chemical Society, contact newsroom@acs.org.

Follow us on Twitter

American Chemical Society

Related Ultrasound Articles:

Ultrasound aligns living cells in bioprinted tissues
Researchers have developed a technique to improve the characteristics of engineered tissues by using ultrasound to align living cells during the biofabrication process.
Ultrasound for thrombosis prevention
Researchers established real-time ultrasonic monitoring of the blood's aggregate state using the in vitro blood flow model.
Ultra ultrasound to transform new tech
A new, more sensitive method to measure ultrasound may revolutionize everything from medical devices to unmanned vehicles.
Shoulder 'brightness' on ultrasound may be a sign of diabetes
A shoulder muscle that appears unusually bright on ultrasound may be a warning sign of diabetes, according to a new study.
Ultrasound-firewall for mobile phones
Mobile phones and tablets through so-called audio tracking, can be used by means of ultrasound to unnoticeably track the behaviour of their users: for example, viewing certain videos or staying in specific rooms and places.
Designing a new material for improved ultrasound
Development of a theoretical basis for ultrahigh piezoelectricity in ferroelectric materials led to a new material with twice the piezo response of any existing commercial ferroelectric ceramics, according to an international team of researchers from Penn State, China and Australia.
Atomic structure of ultrasound material not what anyone expected
Lead magnesium niobate (PMN) is a prototypical
American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM) takes steps to improve the quality of ultrasound imaging in obstetrics and gynecology
The American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM) convened a forum tasked with developing a roadmap for quality improvement in ultrasound imaging in obstetrics and gynecology and set up a task force to establish a consensus curriculum and competency assessment tools for residency training.
Augmented tongue ultrasound for speech therapy
Researchers have developed a system that can display the movements of our own tongues in real time.
Ultrasound imaging of the brain and liver
Ultrasound is commonly used in diagnostic imaging of the body's soft tissues, including muscles, joints, tendons and internal organs.
More Ultrasound News and Ultrasound Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

In & Out Of Love
We think of love as a mysterious, unknowable force. Something that happens to us. But what if we could control it? This hour, TED speakers on whether we can decide to fall in — and out of — love. Guests include writer Mandy Len Catron, biological anthropologist Helen Fisher, musician Dessa, One Love CEO Katie Hood, and psychologist Guy Winch.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#543 Give a Nerd a Gift
Yup, you guessed it... it's Science for the People's annual holiday episode that helps you figure out what sciency books and gifts to get that special nerd on your list. Or maybe you're looking to build up your reading list for the holiday break and a geeky Christmas sweater to wear to an upcoming party. Returning are pop-science power-readers John Dupuis and Joanne Manaster to dish on the best science books they read this past year. And Rachelle Saunders and Bethany Brookshire squee in delight over some truly delightful science-themed non-book objects for those whose bookshelves are already full. Since...
Now Playing: Radiolab

An Announcement from Radiolab