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This Week from AGU: The shifting landscape of science

January 25, 2017

From the Prow

The shifting landscape of science


With each new development in the science policy arena, whether announcements of nominations to lead federal science agencies, or the release of policy priorities, AGU will take action to clearly assess key areas of scientific concern, areas of opportunity, and define strategies that can be undertaken to ensure that that the work of AGU and its members continue to inform and guide the scientific political discourse locally, nationally and internationally, write AGU President Eric Davidson and AGU Executive Director/CEO Chris McEntee.

GeoSpace

Weather patterns, trans-Pacific pollution cause spring ozone spikes in SW US Late spring and early summer is when the air quality is generally good across most of the United States. But newly published research in Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres details how a common springtime weather pattern and pollution transported from Asia often conspire to create unhealthy ozone levels for the desert southwest.

Bursts of methane may have warmed early Mars

In a new study in Geophysical Research Letters, researchers suggest early Mars may have been warmed intermittently by a powerful greenhouse effect.

Arctic melt ponds form when meltwater clogs ice pores

When spring comes to the Arctic, the breakup of the cold winter ice sheets starts at the surface with the formation of melt ponds. Now, researchers describe in a new study in Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans how these melt ponds form, solving a paradoxical mystery of how a pool of water actually sits atop highly porous ice

Eos.org

The Balance of Ice, Waves, and Winds in the Arctic Autumn


Although summer sea ice loss in the Arctic is well studied, less is known about how ice comes back in autumn. A new program is changing that.

Research Spotlights

An Up Close Look at the Megaquakes That Cause Tsunamis


Researchers recreate changes in the seafloor during Japan's devastating 2011 tsunami in a new study in Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth.

A Comparison of Surface Thinning in West Antarctic Glaciers

An uninterrupted 24-year altimetry record of Amundsen Sea Embayment glaciers indicates the initiation and pace of thinning have been inconsistent across the region, according to a new study in Geophysical Research Letters.

Martian Mantle Models Pave the Way for NASA's InSight Lander

The most detailed simulations to date of how heat flows through Mars's interior, detailed in a new study in Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, are good news for the upcoming lander and will help scientists interpret its data.
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American Geophysical Union

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