Nav: Home

Top high-energy prize awarded to LSU physicist and LIGO scientist Gabriela González

January 25, 2017

The 2017 Rossi Prize has been awarded to Gabriela González and the LIGO Scientific Collaboration for the first direct detections of gravitational waves, for the discovery of merging black hole binaries and for beginning the new era of gravitational-wave astronomy.

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, or LIGO, is designed to open the field of gravitational-wave astrophysics through the direct detection of gravitational waves predicted by Einstein's General Theory of Relativity. LIGO consists of two widely separated interferometers within the U.S.--one in Hanford, Wash. and the other in Livingston, La.--operated in unison to detect gravitational waves. In 2016, the LIGO Scientific Collaboration reported the detection of two separate signals of gravitational waves from the merger of black holes.

González is a professor of Physics and Astronomy at Louisiana State University, and spokesperson of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration that includes more than 1,000 scientists from more than 90 institutions around the world.

"The discovery of gravitational waves is a scientific milestone that took a large group of people working very hard for decades," González said. "This is, however, just the beginning. We have opened the field of gravitational-wave astronomy, and we'll learn about distortions in spacetime produced by cataclysmic events, even if they are dark in the electromagnetic spectrum."

She added: "We look forward to exciting decades of new discoveries, not just with LIGO and Virgo ground based detectors, but with a larger network and other instruments spanning the gravitational wavelength spectrum, combining efforts with telescopes in multi-messenger astronomy to explore the high-energy Universe."

The AAS High Energy Astrophysics Division, or HEAD, awards the Rossi Prize in recognition of significant contributions as well as recent and original work in high-energy astrophysics. The prize is in honor of Professor Bruno Rossi, an authority on cosmic ray physics and a pioneer in the field of x-ray astronomy. The prize also includes an engraved certificate and a $1,500 award. González will give a lecture at the 231st AAS meeting in National Harbor, MD, in January 2018.
-end-


Louisiana State University

Related Gravitational Waves Articles:

Are dense star clusters the origin of the gravitational waves discovered by LIGO?
Much to their surprise, scientists are finding dozens of black holes deep within densely packed collections of stars called globular clusters.
Gravitational waves detected a third time
On Jan. 4, 2017, an international team of scientists (including representatives from the University of Maryland) observed gravitational waves -- ripples in the fabric of spacetime -- for the third time.
LIGO detects gravitational waves for third time
The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) has made a third detection of gravitational waves, ripples in space and time, demonstrating that a new window in astronomy has been firmly opened.
Third gravitational wave detection offers new insight into black holes
An international team of researchers has made a third detection of gravitational waves, ripples in space and time, in a discovery that provides new insights into the mysterious nature of black holes and, potentially, dark matter.
Monash researchers uncover new gravitational wave characteristics
Monash researchers have identified a new concept -- 'orphan memory' -- which changes the current thinking around gravitational waves.
Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core
Astronomers have uncovered a supermassive black hole that has been propelled out of the center of a distant galaxy by what could be the awesome power of gravitational waves.
'Gravitational noise' interferes with determining the coordinates of distant sources
A group of Russian astrophysicists from the Astro Space Center (ASC) of P.N.
LIGO veteran to give talk about gravitational waves
Caltech's Stan Whitcomb, who has been involved with nearly every aspect of the development and ultimate success of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), will give a talk about the project's historic detection of gravitational waves on Feb.
Increasing the sensitivity of next-generation gravitational wave detectors
Nearly one year ago today, the LIGO Collaboration announced the detection of gravitational waves, once again confirming Einstein's theory of General Relativity.
Gravitational biology
Akira Kudo at Tokyo Institute of Technology(Tokyo Tech) and colleagues report in Scientific Reports, December 2016, that live-imaging and transcriptome analysis of medaka fish transgenic lines lead to immediate alteration of cells responsible for bone structure formation.

Related Gravitational Waves Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Bias And Perception
How does bias distort our thinking, our listening, our beliefs... and even our search results? How can we fight it? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas about the unconscious biases that shape us. Guests include writer and broadcaster Yassmin Abdel-Magied, climatologist J. Marshall Shepherd, journalist Andreas Ekström, and experimental psychologist Tony Salvador.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#514 Arctic Energy (Rebroadcast)
This week we're looking at how alternative energy works in the arctic. We speak to Louie Azzolini and Linda Todd from the Arctic Energy Alliance, a non-profit helping communities reduce their energy usage and transition to more affordable and sustainable forms of energy. And the lessons they're learning along the way can help those of us further south.