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Gene delivery to the lung can treat broad range of diseases within and beyond the lung

January 25, 2017

New Rochelle, NY, January 25, 2017--Targeting therapeutic genes to the lungs offers the potential to manage serious lung diseases that do not respond to other forms of treatment and to use the lungs as metabolic factories to produce therapeutic proteins for treating systemic diseases. The current status of lung gene therapy, technological advances, future directions, and remaining challenges are presented in a comprehensive review article published in Human Gene Therapy, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Human Gene Therapy website until February 28, 2017.

Dolan Sondhi, Katie Stiles, Bishnu De, and Ronald Crystal, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, describe the progress and promise of lung gene therapy in the article entitled "Genetic Modification of the Lung Directed Toward Treatment of Human Disease"). Preclinical and human clinical studies have targeted genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis, complex disorders including asthma, allergy, and lung cancer, infections such as respiratory syncytial virus and Pseudomonas, lung injury, transplant rejection, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. The authors discuss topics including the effects of lung anatomy on successful gene transfer, various viral and non-viral vector gene delivery strategies, routes of gene administration to the lung, as well as approaches to antisense gene silencing.

"This comprehensive review of preclinical and clinical experience with AAV gene transfer to the lung promises to be a tremendous resource for investigators entering this field," says Editor-in-Chief Terence R. Flotte, MD, Celia and Isaac Haidak Professor of Medical Education and Dean, Provost, and Executive Deputy Chancellor, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA.
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About the Journal

Human Gene Therapy, the Official Journal of the European Society of Gene and Cell Therapy, British Society for Gene and Cell Therapy, French Society of Cell and Gene Therapy, German Society of Gene Therapy, and five other gene therapy societies, is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published monthly in print and online. Led by Editor-in-Chief Terence R. Flotte, MD, Celia and Isaac Haidak Professor of Medical Education and Dean, Provost, and Executive Deputy Chancellor, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Human Gene Therapy presents reports on the transfer and expression of genes in mammals, including humans. Related topics include improvements in vector development, delivery systems, and animal models, particularly in the areas of cancer, heart disease, viral disease, genetic disease, and neurological disease, as well as ethical, legal, and regulatory issues related to the gene transfer in humans. Its companion journals, Human Gene Therapy Methods, published bimonthly and focused on the application of gene therapy to product testing and development, and Human Gene Therapy Clinical Development, published quarterly, features data relevant to the regulatory review and commercial development of cell and gene therapy products. Tables of contents for all three publications and a free sample issue may be viewed on the Human Gene Therapy website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Nucleic Acid Therapeutics, Tissue Engineering, Stem Cells and Development, and Cellular Reprogramming. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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