Harsh punishment, maltreatment in childhood associated with adult antisocial behavior

January 25, 2019

BottomLine: Harsh physical punishment (pushing, grabbing, shoving, slapping and hitting), maltreatment (physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, emotional neglect, physical neglect and exposure to intimate partner violence) and a combination of the two during childhood were all associated with antisocial behaviors in adulthood among men and women. This observational study used data on about 36,000 adults in the general U.S. population. Authors suggest prevention efforts to eliminate harsh physical punishment and maltreatment in childhood should be a public health priority in an effort to reduce antisocial behavior among adults.

Authors: Tracie O. Afifi, Ph.D., University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada, and coauthors

(doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2018.7374)

Editor's Note: The article contains conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
-end-
Want to embed a link to this study in your story? This full-text links will be live at the embargo time https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2722572?guestAccessKey=3d62bf1f-9952-431a-b089-e74fbcf6929c

About JAMA Network Open:JAMA Network Open is the new online-only open access general medical journal from the JAMA Network. Every Friday, the journal publishes peer-reviewed clinical research and commentary in more than 40 medical and health subject areas. Every article is free online from the day of publication.

JAMA Network Open

Related Intimate Partner Violence Articles from Brightsurf:

Combined intimate partner violence that includes sexual violence is common & more damaging
Women who experience sexual violence combined with other forms of intimate partner violence suffer greater damage to their health and are much more likely to attempt suicide, according to a study led by researchers at the University of Bristol's Centre for Academic Primary Care published in the International Journal of Epidemiology today [12 November 2020].

Radiology reveals alarming rise in intimate partner violence during COVID-19 pandemic
Investigators assessed the incidence, pattern and severity of injuries related to Intimate Partner Violence in patients at the Brigham during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Small towns have highest risk of intimate partner violence
Despite common perceptions that big cities have more violence, women living in small towns are most at risk of violence from current or former partners.

Majority of US men want their doctors to ask about intimate partner violence
Nine out of 10 US men ages 18 to 35 support health care providers asking about intimate partner violence, according to new survey analysis.

Intimate partner violence, history of childhood abuse worsen trauma symptoms for new moms
New experiences of sexual, emotional and physical abuse at the hands of a romantic partner during the early months of parenthood are associated with increasing symptoms of trauma such as anxiety, depression, self-harm and sleep disorders, researchers report.

New study shows sharp decrease of intimate partner violence in Nicaragua
The percentage of women and girls in Nicaragua's second-largest city who reported experiencing physical violence by their partners during their lifetimes decreased from 55% in 1995 to 28% in 2016, according to a new study published in the journal BMJ Global Health.

Women raised in poor neighborhoods face an increased risk of intimate partner violence
Women who spend longer periods of their early lives in less affluent neighbourhoods are at greater risk of experiencing violence during their early adulthoods at the hands of their intimate partners, finds a new study published in Epidemiology.

UBCO researcher examines traumatic brain injury in survivors of intimate partner violence
While the diagnoses and treatment of sport-related concussion have well-established guidelines and protocols, a new study from UBC's Okanagan campus is looking at what has previously been an understudied group -- women survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV).

Digital evidence falls short, can hurt victims of intimate partner violence
New research from LSU's Manship School of Mass Communication published in the International Journal of Communication shows digital evidence -- from tablets, smartphones, computers and other electronic communication methods -- can fall short of providing reliable legal evidence in cases of domestic and sexual assault, known as intimate partner violence.

Intimate partner violence is linked to suboptimal breastfeeding practices in poorer countries
Mothers exposed to intimate partner violence in low- and middle-income countries are less likely to initiate breastfeeding early and breastfeed exclusively in the first six months, according to a study published October 1 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Dr Rishi Caleyachetty of the University of Warwick in the UK, and colleagues.

Read More: Intimate Partner Violence News and Intimate Partner Violence Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.