Ben-Gurion U. faculty member receives 2010 Krill Prize for Scientific Research

January 26, 2010

BEER-SHEVA, ISRAEL, January 26, 2010 - Dr. Anne Bernheim, a senior lecturer at the Department of Chemical Engineering of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, has been awarded a prestigious Krill Prize for Excellence in Scientific Research 2010.

Dr. Bernheim received the Prize for her work on developing synthetic artificial biological model systems for improving the understanding of relationships between composition, structure and functionality of cellular systems. This could result in new artificial synthetic devices that can be flexibly programmed to carry out a wide range of specific diagnostic and therapeutic tasks.

Initiated in 2005 by the Krill family, the prizes are awarded annually to outstanding young faculty members at Israeli universities who hold untenured positions in the fields of exact sciences, life sciences, medicine, agriculture and engineering. Selection is made by the Wolf Foundation Scholarships Committee on the basis of the candidate's excellence and the importance of his or her field of research.

The Wolf Foundation was established in 1975 by inventor, diplomat and philanthropist Dr. Ricardo Wolf, "to promote science and art for the benefit of mankind." Since 1978, the Wolf Prizes have been awarded annually to outstanding scientists and artists - irrespective of nationality, race, color, religion, sex or political views - for achievements in the interest of mankind and friendly relations among peoples.
-end-
About American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev plays a vital role in sustaining David Ben-Gurion's vision, creating a world-class institution of education and research in the Israeli desert, nurturing the Negev community and sharing the University's expertise locally and around the globe. With some 19,000 students on campuses in Beer-Sheva, Sede Boqer and Eilat in Israel's southern desert, BGU is a university with a conscience, where the highest academic standards are integrated with community involvement, committed to sustainable development of the Negev. For more information, please visit www.aabgu.org.

American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

Related Engineering Articles from Brightsurf:

Re-engineering antibodies for COVID-19
Catholic University of America researcher uses 'in silico' analysis to fast-track passive immunity

Next frontier in bacterial engineering
A new technique overcomes a serious hurdle in the field of bacterial design and engineering.

COVID-19 and the role of tissue engineering
Tissue engineering has a unique set of tools and technologies for developing preventive strategies, diagnostics, and treatments that can play an important role during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Engineering the meniscus
Damage to the meniscus is common, but there remains an unmet need for improved restorative therapies that can overcome poor healing in the avascular regions.

Artificially engineering the intestine
Short bowel syndrome is a debilitating condition with few treatment options, and these treatments have limited efficacy.

Reverse engineering the fireworks of life
An interdisciplinary team of Princeton researchers has successfully reverse engineered the components and sequence of events that lead to microtubule branching.

New method for engineering metabolic pathways
Two approaches provide a faster way to create enzymes and analyze their reactions, leading to the design of more complex molecules.

Engineering for high-speed devices
A research team from the University of Delaware has developed cutting-edge technology for photonics devices that could enable faster communications between phones and computers.

Breakthrough in blood vessel engineering
Growing functional blood vessel networks is no easy task. Previously, other groups have made networks that span millimeters in size.

Next-gen batteries possible with new engineering approach
Dramatically longer-lasting, faster-charging and safer lithium metal batteries may be possible, according to Penn State research, recently published in Nature Energy.

Read More: Engineering News and Engineering Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.