New software provides 3-D views of arteries in catheterization lab

January 26, 2010

New technology that allows doctors to see three-dimensional images of heart arteries in the catheterization lab passed its first major testing hurdle -- moving doctors closer to understanding its impact on clinical practice, researchers report in Circulation: Cardiovascular Interventions, an American Heart Association journal.

Still in the early stages of testing, the 3-D images may allow cardiologists to more accurately and quickly assess the length, branching pattern, and angles of heart arteries and any blockages.

"Coronary interventions may be improved by having a realistic, 3-D image of the coronary artery tree," said John. D. Carroll, M.D., an investigator for the study and professor of medicine and director of interventional cardiology in the Division of Cardiology at the University of Colorado in Aurora, Colo.

Currently, doctors take multiple two-dimensional X-ray images from different views to visualize what the arteries look like inside the body. The new software, which uses existing X-ray systems, could reduce the need for multiple X-rays, thus decreasing patients' exposure to radiation and contrast dye and cutting the time doctors spend analyzing the images.

During a cardiac catheterization procedure, doctors insert a thin tube called a catheter into a patient's leg artery, then thread it up to the heart. The catheter is then used to inject contrast dye that temporarily fills the coronary arteries allowing x-ray visualization of the inner diameter of the artery. This allows doctors to detect plaque build up, then plan and execute, if needed, the insertion of a coronary stent to open a blocked artery and allow normal blood flow. X-rays are generated below the patient and 2-D shadow-like images of coronary arteries are created by a detector above the patient. These shadow images have been the standard method of presenting coronary angiographic images for over 50 years.

In the study, researchers compared these standard 2-D images to automatically generated, computer-reconstructed 3-D images of 23 patients' coronary artery systems. To generate realistic 3-D images, the detector was rapidly rotated around the patient during the injection of contrast dye, a technique called rotational angiography.

"This is the first in-human use," Carroll said about the feasibility study. "The next step is to test it in multiple centers around the world. In addition, we'll formally test it to see the impact on clinical care. The bottom line is that this is very exciting technology that holds great promise."
-end-
Co-authors are Anne M. Neubauer, Ph.D.; Joel A. Garcia, M.D.; John C. Messenger, M.D.; Eberhard Hansis, Ph.D.; Michael S. Kim, M.D.; Andrew J. P. Klein, M.D.; Gert A. F. Schoonenberg, M.S.; and Michael Grass, Ph.D.

Author disclosures are on the manuscript.

Philips Healthcare funded the study.

Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association's policy or position. The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at www.americanheart.org/corporatefunding.

NR10 - 1008 (CircInterventions/Carroll)

American Heart Association

Related Technology Articles from Brightsurf:

December issue SLAS Technology features 'advances in technology to address COVID-19'
The December issue of SLAS Technology is a special collection featuring the cover article, ''Advances in Technology to Address COVID-19'' by editors Edward Kai-Hua Chow, Ph.D., (National University of Singapore), Pak Kin Wong, Ph.D., (The Pennsylvania State University, PA, USA) and Xianting Ding, Ph.D., (Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China).

October issue SLAS Technology now available
The October issue of SLAS Technology features the cover article, 'Role of Digital Microfl-uidics in Enabling Access to Laboratory Automation and Making Biology Programmable' by Varun B.

Robot technology for everyone or only for the average person?
Robot technology is being used more and more in health rehabilitation and in working life.

Novel biomarker technology for cancer diagnostics
A new way of identifying cancer biomarkers has been developed by researchers at Lund University in Sweden.

Technology innovation for neurology
TU Graz researcher Francesco Greco has developed ultra-light tattoo electrodes that are hardly noticeable on the skin and make long-term measurements of brain activity cheaper and easier.

April's SLAS Technology is now available
April's Edition of SLAS Technology Features Cover Article, 'CURATE.AI: Optimizing Personalized Medicine with Artificial Intelligence'.

Technology in higher education: learning with it instead of from it
Technology has shifted the way that professors teach students in higher education.

Post-lithium technology
Next-generation batteries will probably see the replacement of lithium ions by more abundant and environmentally benign alkali metal or multivalent ions.

Rethinking the role of technology in the classroom
Introducing tablets and laptops to the classroom has certain educational virtues, according to Annahita Ball, an assistant professor in the University at Buffalo School of Social Work, but her research suggests that tech has its limitations as well.

The science and technology of FAST
The Five hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST), located in a radio quiet zone, with the targets (e.g., radio pulsars and neutron stars, galactic and extragalactic 21-cm HI emission).

Read More: Technology News and Technology Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.