Toronto's entertainment district 'hot spot' for violence-related injuries

January 26, 2010

Toronto, Ontario--January 26, 2010 -- Each day people living in large urban centres are injured as the result of violent acts such as physical assault. While existing research tells us where such events are most likely to happen, a new study by Canadian scientists has gone one step further.

"While studies have been done on the geography of violent crime, few researchers have looked at what we call the spatio-temporal patterns of violent injury--not just where these are most likely to occur, but also when," says lead author Dr.Michael Cusimano, a scientist at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto.

Toronto has a single ambulance service serving the emergency needs of its 2.4 million residents, he adds. Each ambulance dispatch is precisely geocoded by longitude and latitude and also time-stamped, providing unique information about the ''where'' and ''when'' of injury.

The researchers analyzed data from EMS, Toronto's ambulance service, which oversees and collects data on approximately 260,000 dispatches per year. The study looked at 4,587 injury-related ambulance dispatches and 10,693 emergency room admissions during 2002 and 2004. Only assault-related injures--those caused by a gun, knife, sharp or blunt object, or a body part such as a fist--were included in the analysis.

Based on data from the EMS, hospitals, and census information, the researchers generated time and location maps for both 24-hour and four-hour daily time periods. The maps recorded the locations of ambulance dispatches; the land use and socioeconomic characteristics of these locations; and the home addresses of injury victims. Several trends were observed:"One of the most interesting things we discovered is that patterns of urban assault-related injury are always changing," says Dr. Cusimano. "The location of injuries shifted over time--from low income areas during daylight and early evening hours to areas of higher income, lower residential density and higher densities of drinking establishments at night."

The researchers think the observed shift to night-life districts has implications for preventive interventions such as policy, law enforcement and strategies aimed at alcohol and drug use not only in Toronto but in large cities all over the world that have "entertainment districts".
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The new study, "Patterns of Urban Violent Injury: A Spatio-Temporal Analysis" was published recently in PLoS One, a journal of the Public Library of Science.

About St. Michael's Hospital

St. Michael's Hospital provides compassionate care to all who walk through its doors. The Hospital also provides outstanding medical education to future health care professionals in more than 23 academic disciplines. Critical care and trauma, heart disease, neurosurgery, diabetes, cancer care, and care of the homeless are among the Hospital's recognized areas of expertise. Through the Keenan Research Centre and the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, research at St. Michael's Hospital is recognized and put into practice around the world. Founded in 1892, the Hospital is fully affiliated with the University of Toronto.

St. Michael's Hospital

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