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An invitation to ESTRO 35

January 26, 2016

What is ESTRO 35?

The ESTRO 35 congress will feature new research results in clinical radiation oncology, radiobiology, physics, technology, patient care, radiation therapy and brachytherapy, presented by top doctors, scientists and radiation therapists from all over the world, working together for the benefit of cancer patients.

The congress is expected to attract 5,000 delegates from more than 80 countries.

The congress will cover the entire spectrum of radiotherapy, both external beam and internal beam with brachytherapy, and highlight what is new across fields as diverse as:
  • state-of-the-art breast brachytherapy
  • combination radiotherapy and targeted agents
  • radiotherapy and health economics
  • how to select the right patients for proton therapy in Europe
  • emerging technologies in particle therapy
  • long-term effects in cancer survivors
  • targeted therapy, stem cells, and normal tissue toxicity
To find full details about ESTRO 35:

The ESTRO web site has full details about ESTRO 35, including the scientific programme, venue, accommodation, media registration etc: http://www.estro.org/congresses-meetings/items/estro-35

Free media registration - on provision of bona fide press credentials

We welcome the media to ESTRO 35. All sessions are open to journalists and registration is free to bona fide journalists on presentation of official press credentials. A media centre with computers, fax, printing, photocopying and free local and international telephone facilities and internet connections will be available. NB: the official conference language is English.

The ESTRO media policy and a downloadable media application form can be found here: http://www.estro.org/congresses-meetings/articles/estro-35-media

If you are unable to attend but wish to receive media information on research being presented at the meeting, please indicate on the registration form and return it to Cécile Hardon-Villard at cecile.hardon@estro.org.
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European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO)

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