Nav: Home

Dual energy computed tomography angiography in the peripheral arterial imaging

January 26, 2017

This is a systematic review of 9 studies on the diagnostic applications of dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) in peripheral arterial disease. The systematic analysis of these studies represent the first summary of studies using DECT with regard to its diagnostic value, radiation dose and contrast medium dose. The review shows that DECT improves diagnostic image quality in imaging peripheral arterial disease when compared to conventional CT angiography, with moderate diagnostic accuracy reported. The review highlights another important application of DECT, which is the significant reduction of contrast medium with up to 50% reduction without losing image quality. Despite these advantages, high radiation dose associated with DECT is still a concern which needs to be addressed by further research. CT is a widely used imaging technique in many clinical applications including the diagnostic assessment of peripheral arterial disease, which is one of the common cardiovascular diseases. Patients suffering from peripheral arterial disease are likely to be associated with other pathologies, such as coronary artery disease or renal damage, therefore, judicious use of contrast medium is of paramount importance because of the risk of contrast-induced acute kidney injury. Thus, analysis of this review suggests the potential value of using low-dose DECT in peripheral arterial disease due to the beneficial effect of lowering contrast medium significantly while still achieving diagnostic images.
-end-
For more information, please visit https://benthamscience.com/journals/current-medical-imaging-reviews/article/142833/

Reference: Almutairi, A., (2017). Dual Energy Computed Tomography Angiography in the Peripheral Arterial Imaging: A Systematic Review of Image Quality, Radiation Dose and Diagnostic Value. Current Medical Imaging Reviews, DOI: 10.2174/1573405612666160602122647

Bentham Science Publishers

Related Coronary Artery Disease Articles:

Human genes for coronary artery disease make them more prolific parents
Coronary artery disease may have persisted in human populations because the genes that cause this late-striking disease also contribute to greater numbers of children, reports Dr Sean Byars of The University of Melbourne and Associate Professor Michael Inouye of the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, Australia, in a study published June 22, 2017 in PLOS Genetics.
Ancient Egyptians to modern humans: Coronary artery disease genes benefit reproduction
Researchers have found that genes for coronary heart disease (CAD) also influence reproduction, so in order to reproduce successfully, the genes for heart disease will also be inherited.
Decreasing cocaine use leads to regression of coronary artery disease
People who use cocaine regularly are at high risk of coronary artery disease.
Association between sugary diet and coronary artery disease
What connection is there between food and drink with added sugar and coronary artery disease?
Coronary artery disease tests prompt patients toward healthier habits
Undergoing a computer tomographic angiography was a better motivator to get people with suspected coronary artery disease to adopt healthier lifestyle practices than an exercise electrocardiography and stress test.
Depressed patients have more frequent chest pain even in the absence of coronary artery disease
Depressed patients have more frequent chest pain even in the absence of coronary artery disease, according to results from the Emory Cardiovascular Biobank presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Salim Hayek, a cardiologist at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia, US.1 The findings suggest that pain and depression may share a common neurochemical pathway.
Heart attack patients without obstructive coronary artery disease at high risk of residual angina
Patients without obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) are just as at risk of angina as those with obstructive CAD, according to new research published today in the European Heart Journal-Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes.
Diagnostic imaging can rule out coronary artery disease in patients with atypical chest pain
Non-invasive diagnostic imaging can rule out coronary artery disease (CAD) in about 50 percent of women with atypical chest pain who are at relatively low risk for CAD, while exposing them to only a modest dose of radiation.
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease shown to affect the development of coronary artery calcification
Data revealed today at The International Liver CongressTM 2015 show that non-alcoholic fatty liver disease plays a role in the early stages of coronary atherosclerosis and in its more severe form it can also promote the development of coronary artery calcification.
Computational fluid dynamics in coronary plaques predict coronary artery disease
A computational fluid dynamics simulation based on 3-D luminal reconstructions of the coronary artery tree can be used to analyze local flow fields and flow profiling resulting from changes in coronary artery geometry.

Related Coronary Artery Disease Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Climate Crisis
There's no greater threat to humanity than climate change. What can we do to stop the worst consequences? This hour, TED speakers explore how we can save our planet and whether we can do it in time. Guests include climate activist Greta Thunberg, chemical engineer Jennifer Wilcox, research scientist Sean Davis, food innovator Bruce Friedrich, and psychologist Per Espen Stoknes.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#527 Honey I CRISPR'd the Kids
This week we're coming to you from Awesome Con in Washington, D.C. There, host Bethany Brookshire led a panel of three amazing guests to talk about the promise and perils of CRISPR, and what happens now that CRISPR babies have (maybe?) been born. Featuring science writer Tina Saey, molecular biologist Anne Simon, and bioethicist Alan Regenberg. A Nobel Prize winner argues banning CRISPR babies won’t work Geneticists push for a 5-year global ban on gene-edited babies A CRISPR spin-off causes unintended typos in DNA News of the first gene-edited babies ignited a firestorm The researcher who created CRISPR twins defends...