Nav: Home

Particle collision in large accelerators is simulated by using a quantum computer

January 26, 2018

Large-scale particle physics laboratories around the world have huge accelerators with a circumference of up to 27 km, as in the case of CERN (Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire). Tremendously costly experiments to study the creation and annihilation of matter are conducted in these accelerators. Would it be possible to simulate these collisions in small experiments on a table top? In 2011 the QUTIS Group led at the UPV/EHU by the Ikerbasque professor Enrique Solano presented a theoretical proposal which they were able to verify seven years later at the trapped-ion laboratory of Prof Kihwan Kim of the University of Tsinghua.

"We set up a quantum theatre in which the particles behave like actors in a quantum computer, in other words, some imitate others for various purposes," explained Prof Enrique Solano. There was a fun side to this but also a very practical one, since these experiments would in the future entail the saving of money and would also involve controlled tests that would be impossible to calculate using conventional computers. "We managed to imitate how matter (represented by fermions, one of the two types of elementary particles that exist in nature) and antimatter (anti-fermions) is created and destroyed using lasers, loaded atoms (ions) and atomic traps. In other words, we simulated physics that is very similar to that of the large accelerators using a trapped-ion quantum computer," added the head of the QUTIS Group.
-end-
About the QUTIS group

The QUTIS Group is a world leader in quantum simulation and computation and has come up with proposals for quantum implementations that have been carried out by leading labs across the world. The group collaborates with researchers all over the world and works in a range of quantum platforms, such as trapped ions, superconductor circuits, quantum photonics, and nuclear magnetic resonance. It also routinely collaborates with multinational technology companies in the sector, such as Google and IBM. The team of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country, which has participated in this experiment, is led by Prof Enrique Solano, and Drs Lucas Lamata, Jorge Casanova, and Julen Pedernales have also been involved in it. Jorge Casanova, and Julen Pedernales began participating in this project during their work in QUTIS and are currently post-PhD researchers at the University of Ulm (Germany).

Bibliographical reference

Xiang Zhang, Kuan Zhang, Yangchao Shen, Shuaining Zhang, Jing-Ning Zhang, Man-Hong Yung, Jorge Casanova, Julen S. Pedernales, Lucas Lamata, Enrique Solano & Kihwan Kim Experimental quantum simulation of fermion-antifermion scattering via boson exchange in a trapped ion* Nature Communications 9, 195 (2018) DOI:10.1038/s41467-017-02507-y

University of the Basque Country

Related Quantum Computer Articles:

Johns Hopkins researchers discover material that could someday power quantum computer
Quantum computers with the ability to perform complex calculations, encrypt data more securely and more quickly predict the spread of viruses, may be within closer reach thanks to a new discovery by Johns Hopkins researchers.
New research brings scientists one step closer to a fully functioning quantum computer
Quantum computing has the potential to revolutionize technology, medicine, and science by providing faster and more efficient processors, sensors, and communication devices.
Quantum computers to clarify the connection between the quantum and classical worlds
Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists have developed a new quantum computing algorithm that offers a clearer understanding of the quantum-to-classical transition, which could help model systems on the cusp of quantum and classical worlds, such as biological proteins, and also resolve questions about how quantum mechanics applies to large-scale objects.
Imaging of exotic quantum particles as building blocks for quantum computing
Researchers have imaged an exotic quantum particle -- called a Majorana fermion -- that can be used as a building block for future qubits and eventually the realization of quantum computers.
Quantum rebar: Quantum dots enhance stability of solar-harvesting perovskite crystals
Engineering researchers have combined two emerging technologies for next-generation solar power -- and discovered that each one helps stabilize the other.
Computer program developed to find 'leakage' in quantum computers
A new computer program that spots when information in a quantum computer is escaping to unwanted states will give users of this promising technology the ability to check its reliability without any technical knowledge for the first time.
Researchers reverse the flow of time on IBM's quantum computer
An international team of scientists led by the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory explored the concept of reversing time in a first-of-its-kind experiment, managing to return a computer briefly to the past.
Physicists reverse time using quantum computer
Researchers from the Russia teamed up with colleagues from the US and Switzerland and returned the state of a quantum computer a fraction of a second into the past.
In the blink of an eye: Team uses quantum of light to create new quantum simulator
Imagine being stuck inside a maze and wanting to find your way out.
Quantum scientists demonstrate world-first 3D atomic-scale quantum chip architecture
UNSW scientists have shown that their pioneering single atom technology can be adapted to building 3D silicon quantum chips -- with precise interlayer alignment and highly accurate measurement of spin states.
More Quantum Computer News and Quantum Computer Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Rethinking Anger
Anger is universal and complex: it can be quiet, festering, justified, vengeful, and destructive. This hour, TED speakers explore the many sides of anger, why we need it, and who's allowed to feel it. Guests include psychologists Ryan Martin and Russell Kolts, writer Soraya Chemaly, former talk radio host Lisa Fritsch, and business professor Dan Moshavi.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#538 Nobels and Astrophysics
This week we start with this year's physics Nobel Prize awarded to Jim Peebles, Michel Mayor, and Didier Queloz and finish with a discussion of the Nobel Prizes as a way to award and highlight important science. Are they still relevant? When science breakthroughs are built on the backs of hundreds -- and sometimes thousands -- of people's hard work, how do you pick just three to highlight? Join host Rachelle Saunders and astrophysicist, author, and science communicator Ethan Siegel for their chat about astrophysics and Nobel Prizes.