Nav: Home

Survival of preterm babies improves by 25% after quality-improvement program

January 27, 2020

The rate of survival of very preterm babies in Canada increased 25% after the national Evidence-based Practice for Improving Quality (EPIQ) program was introduced in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) across the country, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.190940

The EPIQ program was introduced in 2003 by the Canadian Neonatal Network in 25 neonatal units to improve outcomes for premature babies. The study, originating from Sinai Health in Toronto, analyzed the effect of changes in care practices on outcomes for 50 831 infants born prematurely between 2004 and 2017. Researchers found that survival without major adverse health effects increased from 56.6% to 70.9% (25%) for very preterm babies and from 70.8% to 74.5% (5%) for babies born between 23 and 25 weeks' gestation, over the course of the 14-year program.

Preterm babies often have chronic health issues due to early premature birth, and this quality improvement program resulted in a significant reduction in several adverse outcomes for such babies. For example, the researchers also found that participation in the program was associated with a 15% decrease in bronchopulmonary dysplasia, a chronic lung disease associated with prematurity, and a 44% decrease in late-onset sepsis and other adverse conditions.

"Within the Canadian neonatal community, we have developed a system of continuously learning from each centre about how evidence-based strategies are implemented and what are the barriers and facilitators for improving quality," says Dr. Prakesh Shah, Paediatrician-in-Chief at Sinai Health and Director of the Canadian Neonatal Network. "This learning, combined with a regular flow of data to guide our practices, has significantly improved outcomes for most vulnerable newborns."

An international study of 10 high-income countries found that neonatal outcomes improved the most in Canada, perhaps because of the EPIQ program, which is now standard practice in Canadian NICUs. It has also been adapted in other countries.

"Our study shows that if we apply what we know in a systematic way, we can improve quality of care and outcomes over the longer term for preterm babies," says Dr. Shah.

In a related commentary, Dr. Mary Brindle, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, writes "EPIQ demonstrates a rare sustained achievement...which clearly illustrates the importance of commitment to ongoing improvement in national quality-improvement programs." She contrasts EPIQ with several other initiatives that have struggled to sustain change on a large scale. http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.200008

"Outcomes and care practices for preterm infants born at less than 33 weeks' gestation: a quality-improvement study" is published January 27, 2020
-end-


Canadian Medical Association Journal

Related Preterm Babies Articles:

New clues on how lipid emulsions prevent liver disease in preterm babies
New evidence links the microbiome and gut bile acids to lipid emulsion prevention of liver disease in preterm babies.
Preterm babies are more likely to be diagnosed with reactive attachment disorder
Premature birth, low birth weight, and neonatal intensive care are associated with the risk of being diagnosed with reactive attachment disorder (RAD).
Survival of preterm babies improves by 25% after quality-improvement program
The rate of survival of very preterm babies in Canada increased 25% after the national Evidence-based Practice for Improving Quality (EPIQ) program was introduced in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) across the country, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
Study answers when moderate to late preterm babies go home
'When is my baby going home?' is one of the first questions asked by families of infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).
Children born preterm are more likely to be placed outside the home
Children born prematurely, i.e. before week 37, are more likely to be placed outside the home as a supportive child welfare measure than their full-term counterparts, according to a population study conducted by the Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL).
Preterm babies are less likely to form romantic relationships in adulthood
Adults who were born preterm (under 37 weeks gestation) are less likely to have a romantic relationship, a sexual partner and experience parenthood than those born full term.
Well-known drug has less risk for preterm delivery in PCOS
Metformin significantly reduces the risk of late miscarriages and preterm births for women with PCOS.
Sweden leads the world in saving extremely preterm babies
The survival rate among extremely preterm babies has greatly improved in Sweden, a country that offers top-class neonatal care, a study from Karolinska Institutet published in the esteemed journal JAMA reports.
The Lancet Child & Ado. Health: Caring for preterm babies in single family rooms may help prevent sepsis and improve exclusive breastfeeding
Caring for preterm babies in single family rooms appears to reduce the incidence of sepsis and improve exclusive breastfeeding rates compared with traditional open ward neonatal units, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis published in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health journal.
Checking very preterm babies' head size can help identify long-term IQ problems
Regular early head circumference assessments add valuable information when screening for long-term neurocognitive risk - according to new research by an international research collaboration, including the University of Warwick, UK and the University of Tennessee Knoxville, US.
More Preterm Babies News and Preterm Babies Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Our Relationship With Water
We need water to live. But with rising seas and so many lacking clean water – water is in crisis and so are we. This hour, TED speakers explore ideas around restoring our relationship with water. Guests on the show include legal scholar Kelsey Leonard, artist LaToya Ruby Frazier, and community organizer Colette Pichon Battle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#569 Facing Fear
What do you fear? I mean really fear? Well, ok, maybe right now that's tough. We're living in a new age and definition of fear. But what do we do about it? Eva Holland has faced her fears, including trauma and phobia. She lived to tell the tale and write a book: "Nerve: Adventures in the Science of Fear".
Now Playing: Radiolab

Uncounted
First things first: our very own Latif Nasser has an exciting new show on Netflix. He talks to Jad about the hidden forces of the world that connect us all. Then, with an eye on the upcoming election, we take a look back: at two pieces from More Perfect Season 3 about Constitutional amendments that determine who gets to vote. Former Radiolab producer Julia Longoria takes us to Washington, D.C. The capital is at the heart of our democracy, but it's not a state, and it wasn't until the 23rd Amendment that its people got the right to vote for president. But that still left DC without full representation in Congress; D.C. sends a "non-voting delegate" to the House. Julia profiles that delegate, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, and her unique approach to fighting for power in a virtually powerless role. Second, Radiolab producer Sarah Qari looks at a current fight to lower the US voting age to 16 that harkens back to the fight for the 26th Amendment in the 1960s. Eighteen-year-olds at the time argued that if they were old enough to be drafted to fight in the War, they were old enough to have a voice in our democracy. But what about today, when even younger Americans are finding themselves at the center of national political debates? Does it mean we should lower the voting age even further? This episode was reported and produced by Julia Longoria and Sarah Qari. Check out Latif Nasser's new Netflix show Connected here. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.