Nav: Home

AI to help monitor behavior

January 27, 2020

Could artificial intelligence improve educational and clinical decisions made by your child's teacher, or your mental-health professional or even your medical doctor? Yes, indeed, says a study by an UdeM psychoeducator and behaviour analyst published in Perspectives on Behavior Science.

When working with persons who experience daily challenges such as autism, ADHD, learning difficulties or mental health issues, practitioners often rely on their professional judgment to determine whether behavior is improving following intervention. But that's not enough, according to the study.

"Unfortunately, experts often disagree when drawing conclusions based on behavioral data, which may lead to the premature interruption of an effective intervention or to the continuation of an ineffective treatment," said lead author Marc Lanovaz, a researcher at the Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal.

To find a better way, Lanovaz and colleagues at UdeM-affiliated Polytechnique Montréal and Manhattanville College in Purchase, N.Y. independently labeled more than 1,000 graphs and trained new decision models using machine learning.

The conclusions drawn by these models were then compared to those produced by the visual-aid tool most studied by today's researchers.

"Although we always assumed that our models would perform well, we did not expect them to be as accurate," said Lanovaz, an associate professor who heads the Applied Behavioral Research Lab at UdeM's School of Psychoeducation.

"Not only did the conclusions drawn by our models match the interpretation of experts more frequently than the most popular tool, they also produced more accurate conclusions on novel data," he said.

According the authors, these models could eventually support practitioners in making better decisions about the effectiveness of their interventions.

"By improving decision-making, practitioners should more rapidly and accurately identify effective and ineffective behavioral interventions," said Lanovaz. "Ultimately, we hope this change would translate to better tailored interventions for people with developmental disabilities, mental health issues or learning difficulties."
-end-


University of Montreal

Related Behavior Articles:

How synaptic changes translate to behavior changes
Learning changes behavior by altering many connections between brain cells in a variety of ways all at the same time, according to a study of sea slugs recently published in JNeurosci.
I won't have what he's having: The brain and socially motivated behavior
Monkeys devalue rewards when they anticipate that another monkey will get them instead.
Unlocking animal behavior through motion
Using physics to study different types of animal motion, such as burrowing worms or flying flocks, can reveal how animals behave in different settings.
AI to help monitor behavior
Algorithms based on artificial intelligence do better at supporting educational and clinical decision-making, according to a new study.
Increasing opportunities for sustainable behavior
To mitigate climate change and safeguard ecosystems, we need to make drastic changes in our consumption and transport behaviors.
Predicting a protein's behavior from its appearance
Researchers at EPFL have developed a new way to predict a protein's interactions with other proteins and biomolecules, and its biochemical activity, merely by observing its surface.
Spirituality affects the behavior of mortgagers
According to Olga Miroshnichenko, a Sc.D in Economics, and a Professor at the Department of Economics and Finance, Tyumen State University, morals affect the thinking of mortgage payers and help them avoid past due payments.
Asking if behavior can be changed on climate crisis
One of the more complex problems facing social psychologists today is whether any intervention can move people to change their behavior about climate change and protecting the environment for the sake of future generations.
Is Instagram behavior motivated by a desire to belong?
Does a desire to belong and perceived social support drive a person's frequency of Instagram use?
A 3D view of climatic behavior at the third pole
Research across several areas of the 'Third Pole' -- the high-mountain region centered on the Tibetan Plateau -- shows a seasonal cycle in how near-surface temperature changes with elevation.
More Behavior News and Behavior Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Our Relationship With Water
We need water to live. But with rising seas and so many lacking clean water – water is in crisis and so are we. This hour, TED speakers explore ideas around restoring our relationship with water. Guests on the show include legal scholar Kelsey Leonard, artist LaToya Ruby Frazier, and community organizer Colette Pichon Battle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#568 Poker Face Psychology
Anyone who's seen pop culture depictions of poker might think statistics and math is the only way to get ahead. But no, there's psychology too. Author Maria Konnikova took her Ph.D. in psychology to the poker table, and turned out to be good. So good, she went pro in poker, and learned all about her own biases on the way. We're talking about her new book "The Biggest Bluff: How I Learned to Pay Attention, Master Myself, and Win".
Now Playing: Radiolab

Uncounted
First things first: our very own Latif Nasser has an exciting new show on Netflix. He talks to Jad about the hidden forces of the world that connect us all. Then, with an eye on the upcoming election, we take a look back: at two pieces from More Perfect Season 3 about Constitutional amendments that determine who gets to vote. Former Radiolab producer Julia Longoria takes us to Washington, D.C. The capital is at the heart of our democracy, but it's not a state, and it wasn't until the 23rd Amendment that its people got the right to vote for president. But that still left DC without full representation in Congress; D.C. sends a "non-voting delegate" to the House. Julia profiles that delegate, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, and her unique approach to fighting for power in a virtually powerless role. Second, Radiolab producer Sarah Qari looks at a current fight to lower the US voting age to 16 that harkens back to the fight for the 26th Amendment in the 1960s. Eighteen-year-olds at the time argued that if they were old enough to be drafted to fight in the War, they were old enough to have a voice in our democracy. But what about today, when even younger Americans are finding themselves at the center of national political debates? Does it mean we should lower the voting age even further? This episode was reported and produced by Julia Longoria and Sarah Qari. Check out Latif Nasser's new Netflix show Connected here. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.