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New bacteriophage fully characterized and sequenced

January 27, 2020

New Rochelle, NY, January 27, 2020--Researchers have identified a new bacteriophage that can infect and destroy bacteria in the genus Pantoea, for which few bacteriophage have been identified and characterized. Details of the isolation, characterization, and full genome sequencing of this new bacteriophage are published in the new Genome Introduction section of PHAGE: Therapy, Applications, and Research, a new peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. Click here to read the full-text article free on the PHAGE website through February 27, 2020.

The article entitled "Isolation and Characterization of vB_PagP-SK1, a T7-Like Phage Infecting Pantoea agglomerans." was coauthored by John Stavrinides, University of Regina (Canada) and colleagues from University of Otago (Dunedin, New Zealand), Roy Romanow Provincial laboratory (Regina, Canada), and Cadham Provincial Laboratory (Winnipeg, Canada).

Members of the Pantoea genus can cause disease in plant and animal hosts, as well as opportunistic infections in humans. The researchers showed the new bacteriophage vB_PagP-SK1 to have a broad host range, capable of infecting 15 strains of Pantoea across three species groups - primarily P. agglomerans - together with one strain of Erwinia billingiae. vB-PagP-SK1 belongs to the Teseptimavirus genus and is most closely related to the E. amylovora phage vB_EamP-L1.

"The first Genome Introduction describes the isolation and characterization of a novel bacteriophage (vB_PagP-SK1)," states Dr. Andrew Millard, Section Editor of PHAGE and University of Leicester, U.K. "Utilizing a novel high throughput microplate assay for host range studies, the phage vB_PagP-SK1 was shown to infect multiple species within the genus Pantoea and Erwinia. Combined with genomic data, it demonstrated that genetically similar bacteriophages can have different host ranges."
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About the Journal

PHAGE: Therapy, Applications, and Research is the only peer-reviewed journal dedicated to fundamental bacteriophage research and its applications in medicine, agriculture, aquaculture, veterinary applications, animal production, food safety, and food production. Led by Editor-in-Chief, Martha Clokie, PhD, University of Leicester, United Kingdom, the Journal showcases groundbreaking research, reviews, commentaries, opinion pieces, profiles and perspectives dedicated to defining the roles of phages in all facets of microbiology and microbial ecology and exploring their potential to manipulate bacterial communities and treat infection. More information is available on the PHAGE website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including The CRISPR Journal, Human Gene Therapy, Microbial Drug Resistance, and Viral Immunology. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 90 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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