Nav: Home

A way to look younger is right under your nose, UCLA-led study finds

January 27, 2020

From face-lifts to facials and fillers, there's no shortage of ways to reduce the inevitable signs of aging. But there's one cosmetic procedure that most people don't think about as a tool that can make women look years younger.

Rhinoplasty, or cosmetic nose surgery, may make a woman look up to three years younger, according to a new study led by researchers at UCLA that used a type of artificial intelligence known as machine learning.

The researchers used the technology to study before-and-after photos of 100 female patients, ages 16 to 72, all of whom underwent rhinoplasty for cosmetic reasons by a UCLA surgeon and senior author of the study. At 12 or more weeks later, standardized photographs were analyzed with the technology, which estimates a person's age by cropping the face from a photograph and then extracting a prediction through an algorithm.

"Rhinoplasty is widely recognized as a facial beautification procedure, but it isn't commonly known for its anti-aging effects," said Dr. Robert Dorfman, lead author of the study and a resident physician in the division of plastic and reconstructive surgery at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. The study was published in the Aesthetic Surgery Journal.

Rhinoplasty involves making structural changes to the bone and cartilage through small incisions inside the nose and when necessary around the nostril, all while a patient is under general anesthesia. The rhinoplasty procedures in this study were customized for each patient to fit the person's face best.

Until now, Dorfman said, there has been little to no objective scientific evidence for the rejuvenating effect of rhinoplasty. "This technology allows us to accurately estimate age in an objective way and has proven to recognize patterns and features of aging beyond what the human eye can perceive," he said.

The results were even more dramatic in women over 40, some of whom were estimated to look seven years younger after rhinoplasty. However, because the sample size of the 40-plus group was small (25 women), the researchers said further studies need to be done to validate the results. (The median age of the study participants was 32.)

The nose is not usually a focus of anti-aging treatment. However, like other features of the body, the human nose, which is made up of soft tissue, cartilage and bone, also ages.

"The nose loses support as it ages and can take on a more prominent or droopy appearance," said Dr. Jason Roostaeian, senior author of the study and associate clinical professor in the division of plastic and reconstructive surgery at the Geffen School.

The nose is also affected when other features of the face age. "When we lose facial fat and volume in our cheeks, which are the canvas that our nose sits on, the nose becomes more prominent."

By refining the nose, he said, the youthful appearance of the entire face can be refined. "This is something we have subjectively thought for many decades but now we have objective evidence through artificial intelligence to support this."
-end-


University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Related Aging Articles:

The first roadmap for ovarian aging
Infertility likely stems from age-related decline of the ovaries, but the molecular mechanisms that lead to this decline have been unclear.
Researchers discover new cause of cell aging
New research from the USC Viterbi School of Engineering could be key to our understanding of how the aging process works.
Deep Aging Clocks: The emergence of AI-based biomarkers of aging and longevity
The advent of deep biomarkers of aging, longevity and mortality presents a range of non-obvious applications.
Intelligence can link to health and aging
For over 100 years, scientists have sought to understand what links a person's general intelligence, health and aging.
Putting the brakes on aging
Salk Institute researchers have developed a new gene therapy to help decelerate the aging process.
New insights into the aging brain
A group of scientists at the Gladstone Institutes investigated why the choroid plexus contains so much more klotho than other brain regions.
We all want 'healthy aging,' but what is it, really? New report looks for answers
Led by Paul Mulhausen, MD, MHS, FACP, AGSF, colleagues from the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) set looking critically at what 'healthy aging' really means.
New insight into aging
Researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (The Neuro) of McGill University examined the effects of aging on neuroplasticity in the primary auditory cortex, the part of the brain that processes auditory information.
Aging may be as old as life itself
Aging has had a bad rap since it has long been considered a consequence of biology's concentrated effort on enhancing survival through reproductivity.
A new link between cancer and aging
Human lung cancer cells resist dying by controlling parts of the aging process, according to findings published online May 10th in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
More Aging News and Aging Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Climate Mindset
In the past few months, human beings have come together to fight a global threat. This hour, TED speakers explore how our response can be the catalyst to fight another global crisis: climate change. Guests include political strategist Tom Rivett-Carnac, diplomat Christiana Figueres, climate justice activist Xiye Bastida, and writer, illustrator, and artist Oliver Jeffers.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Speedy Beet
There are few musical moments more well-worn than the first four notes of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. But in this short, we find out that Beethoven might have made a last-ditch effort to keep his music from ever feeling familiar, to keep pushing his listeners to a kind of psychological limit. Big thanks to our Brooklyn Philharmonic musicians: Deborah Buck and Suzy Perelman on violin, Arash Amini on cello, and Ah Ling Neu on viola. And check out The First Four Notes, Matthew Guerrieri's book on Beethoven's Fifth. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.