How fat loss accelerates facial aging

January 27, 2021

January 27, 2021 - For many of us, as we get older the skin on our face begins to sag and we seem to lose volume around our eyes, cheeks and chin. Is gravity taking its toll in our later years or do we lose fat over the course of several years that many of us associate with youth, vibrancy and energy? Understanding the cause is paramount to how plastic surgeons treat the signs of facial aging.

The traditional theory is sagging: the facial soft tissues simply yield to the effects of gravity over time. And while the idea that weakening ligaments in the midface could result in soft tissue descent still has merit, more recent studies point in another direction. Perhaps the real culprit behind facial aging is the loss of fat - both near the surface of the skin and in deeper areas.

In a new study featured in the February issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS), Aaron Morgan, MD, of the Medical College of Wisconsin and his colleagues studied 19 patients who underwent computed tomography (CT) scans of the head on two occasions at least a decade apart. Although the patients weren't undergoing facelift surgery or any other cosmetic procedure, scans proved useful for measuring changes in fat deposits in the midface - the area between the eyes and mouth - over time. The patients averaged about 46 years at the time of their initial scan and 57 years at follow-up.

While the findings varied among patients, the results showed "definite and measurable loss of midface fat volume." The total volume of facial fat decreased from about 46.50 cc (cubic centimeters) at the initial scan to 40.8 cc at the follow-up scan: a reduction of about 12.2 percent.

However, the amount of reduction wasn't the same at all levels. Fat volume in the superficial compartment, just under the skin, decreased by an average of 11.3 percent. That compared to an average 18.4 percent reduction in the deep facial fat compartment.

The findings provide direct evidence to support the "volume loss" theory of facial aging - and may help in understanding some of the specific issues that lead patients to seek facial rejuvenation. "In particular, we think that deep facial fat loss removes support from the overlying fat," Dr. Morgan explains. "That causes deepening of the nasolabial fold, which runs from the nose to the mouth. Meanwhile, fat loss closer to the surface makes the cheeks appear deflated."

Variations in fat volume loss can also explain aging-related hollowing around the eyes and heaviness of the jowls. "The upper face has less fat to begin with, so fat loss is more apparent," said Dr. Morgan. "In contrast, the cheek or buccal area has relatively little fat loss, so that area appears fuller as changes occur in other areas of the midface."

This study could help plastic surgeons identify techniques to replace or reposition the midface fat in a more "physiologic" way. "We think that our findings will help plastic surgeons design more natural approaches to facial rejuvenation, with the aim of re-creating the facial fat distribution of youth," said Dr. Morgan. "This proves there is volume depletion and not just laxity of tissues with aging. So, volume replacement should be used in addition to surgical procedures to attempt to recreate the youthful face."
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Click here to read "Facial Aging: A Quantitative Analysis of Midface Volume Changes over 11 Years."
DOI: 10.1097/PRS.0000000000007518

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery® is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

About Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

For more than 70 years, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery® (http://www.prsjournal.com/) has been the one consistently excellent reference for every specialist who uses plastic surgery techniques or works in conjunction with a plastic surgeon. The official journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery® brings subscribers up-to-the-minute reports on the latest techniques and follow-up for all areas of plastic and reconstructive surgery, including breast reconstruction, experimental studies, maxillofacial reconstruction, hand and microsurgery, burn repair and cosmetic surgery, as well as news on medico-legal issues.

About ASPS

The American Society of Plastic Surgeons is the largest organization of board-certified plastic surgeons in the world. Representing more than 7,000 physician members, the society is recognized as a leading authority and information source on cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery. ASPS comprises more than 94 percent of all board-certified plastic surgeons in the United States. Founded in 1931, the society represents physicians certified by The American Board of Plastic Surgery or The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

About Wolters Kluwer

Wolters Kluwer (WKL) is a global leader in professional information, software solutions, and services for the clinicians, nurses, accountants, lawyers, and tax, finance, audit, risk, compliance, and regulatory sectors. We help our customers make critical decisions every day by providing expert solutions that combine deep domain knowledge with advanced technology and services.

Wolters Kluwer reported 2019 annual revenues of €4.6 billion. The group serves customers in over 180 countries, maintains operations in over 40 countries, and employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide. The company is headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands.

Wolters Kluwer provides trusted clinical technology and evidence-based solutions that engage clinicians, patients, researchers and students with advanced clinical decision support, learning and research and clinical intelligence. For more information about our solutions, visit https://www.wolterskluwer.com/en/health and follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter @WKHealth.

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