Call for increase in flu vaccination among young children

January 28, 2004

Authors of a review in the February issue of THE LANCET INFECTIOUS DISEASES conclude that current research supports a widening of influenza vaccination to specific groups of young children-including infants between six months and two years of age, children with recurrent ear infection or upper respiratory-tract infection, and healthy children attending day-care centres or elementary school.

Recent studies have suggested that paediatric influenza is a greater medical problem than usually thought because it can cause excess hospitalisations, medical visits, and antibiotic prescriptions even in healthy children, especially those under 2 years. Furthermore, influenza in otherwise healthy children may have substantial socioeconomic consequences for the children and their household contacts.

Nicola Principi and Susanna Esposito from the University of Milan, Italy, review the current research into paediatric influenza vaccination and of the logistical and economic considerations that will influence the implementation of more widespread vaccination programmes.

Outlining the main conclusions of the review, Nicola Principi comments: "Increased efforts are needed to identify and recall high-risk children because their rate of vaccination coverage is still much lower than it should be. Second, the immunisation of infants aged 6-23 months and their close contacts should be encouraged as much as possible because of the substantially increased risk of influenza-related hospitalisations. Third, children with recurrent acute otitis media [middle-ear infection] or respiratory-tract infections, and healthy children attending day-care centres or elementary schools, should be included among the paediatric groups requiring vaccination to reduce the direct and indirect costs of influenza in the children themselves and their unvaccinated household contacts.

Susanna Esposito adds: "The issues that need to be addressed include educating physicians and parents about influenza-related morbidity, the safety and cost-effectiveness of licensed vaccines, the adequacy of vaccine supplies, and the availability of intranasal products insofar as the greater compliance to nasal administration should make it possible to increase the use of influenza vaccination."
-end-
Contact: Dr Nicola Principi, Paediatric Department University of Milan, Via Commenda 9, 20122 Milan, Italy; T): 39-3356-561739; E): Nicola.Principi@unimi.it.

Lancet

Related Influenza Articles from Brightsurf:

Predicting influenza epidemics
Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, have developed a unique method to predict influenza epidemics by combining several sources of data.

Common cold combats influenza
As the flu season approaches, a strained public health system may have a surprising ally -- the common cold virus.

Scent-sensing cells have a better way to fight influenza
Smell receptors that line the nose get hit by Influenza B just like other cells, but they are able to clear the infection without dying.

New antivirals for influenza and Zika
Leuven researchers have deployed synthetic amyloids to trigger protein misfolding as a strategy to combat the influenza A and Zika virus.

Assessment of deaths from COVID-19, seasonal influenza
Publicly available data were used to analyze the number of deaths from seasonal influenza deaths compared with deaths from COVID-19.

Obesity promotes virulence of influenza
Obesity promotes the virulence of the influenza virus, according to a study conducted in mice published in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Influenza: combating bacterial superinfection with the help of the microbiota
Frenc researchers and from Brazilian (Belo Horizonte), Scottish (Glasgow) and Danish (Copenhagen) laboratories have shown for the first time in mice that perturbation of the gut microbiota caused by the influenza virus favours secondary bacterial superinfection.

Chemists unveil the structure of an influenza B protein
MIT chemists have discovered the structure of an influenza B protein called BM2, a finding that could help researchers design drugs that block the protein and help prevent the virus from spreading.

How proteins help influenza A bind and slice its way to cells
Researchers have provided new insight on how two proteins help influenza A virus particles fight their way to human cells.

Eating elderberries can help minimize influenza symptoms
Conducted by Professor Fariba Deghani, Dr. Golnoosh Torabian and Dr.

Read More: Influenza News and Influenza Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.