Renal hemodynamics and cardiovascular function in health and disease

January 28, 2016

Bethesda, MD - The SRC will focus on unpublished work that is state-of-the-art in study of cardiovascular and renal disease and hypertension. There will be sessions on both acute kidney disease and chronic kidney disease. One major focus will be the contribution of obesity and metabolic diseases to kidney disease and hypertension. New to the program is the inclusion of a session on developmental programming of cardiovascular-renal disease as many investigators are now finding that what happens in utero increases the risk for hypertension and cardiovascular-renal disease later in life. Top scientists will also present a session on genetics and epigenetics in the kidney, a current topic of interest. Sex steroids have been shown more recently to contribute to the mechanisms responsible for kidney disease and hypertension, and may explain why blood pressure in women is less well controlled than men and why men have a higher incidence in end stage renal disease. As NIH has now mandated the inclusion of both sexes/ genders in funded basic research studies going forward, the inclusion of topics in women or in sex/gender differences in our program is timely. Finally, the role played by T cells, inflammation, and other immunological pathways in renal disease and hypertension is an important research topic that has been steadily gaining in interest over the past several years, and a session will be included on this topic that will include some of the top scientists in the area.

FASEB has announced a total of 36 Science Research Conferences (SRC) in 2016. Registration opens January 7, 2016. For more information about an SRC, view preliminary programs, or find a listing of all our 2016 SRCs, please visit http://www.faseb.org/SRC.
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Since 1982, FASEB SRC has offered a continuing series of inter-disciplinary exchanges that are recognized as a valuable complement to the highly successful society meetings. Divided into small groups, scientists from around the world meet intimately and without distractions to explore new approaches to those research areas undergoing rapid scientific changes. In efforts to expand the SRC series, potential organizers are encouraged to contact SRC staff at SRC@faseb.org. Proposal guidelines can be found at http://www.faseb.org/SRC.

FASEB is composed of 30 societies with more than 125,000 members, making it the largest coalition of biomedical research associations in the United States. Our mission is to advance health and welfare by promoting progress and education in biological and biomedical sciences through service to our member societies and collaborative advocacy.

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

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