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Simple classification can help define and predict limb-threatening diabetic infections

January 30, 2007

Research groups from Texas, Chicago, Washington State and the Netherlands partnered to publish a landmark study validating the Infectious Disease Society of America's guidelines for the clinical classification of diabetic foot infections.

"We're all very pleased to see this study in print," noted co-author David G. Armstrong, DPM, PhD, Professor of Surgery at Scholl's Center for Lower Extremity Ambulatory Research (CLEAR) at Rosalind Franklin University. "What this provides us now is confirmation that a simple system that labels infections as mild, moderate or severe can have a dramatic impact on predicting hospitalization and amputation. This will go a long way toward helping us to most effectively guide therapy and communicate with our patients."
-end-
The study is published in the February issue of the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases. The classification system itself is freely available at www.diabetic-foot.net.

Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science educates medical doctors, health professionals and biomedical scientists in a personalized atmosphere. The University is located at 3333 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, IL 60064, and encompasses Chicago Medical School, College of Health Professions, Dr. William M. Scholl College of Podiatric Medicine, and School of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies. Visit at www.rosalindfranklin.edu and www.lifeindiscovery.com.

Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science

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