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Oxford University Press to publish Diseases of the Esophagus

January 30, 2017

Oxford University Press and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus (ISDE) are pleased to announce their new partnership to publish Diseases of the Esophagus, ISDE's monthly scientific journal.

Diseases of the Esophagus publishes original research papers, systematic reviews and meta-analysis, commissioned review articles from international experts, clinical guidelines, and editorials focusing on the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the esophageal diseases. It is the unique international journal that offers comprehensive articles on diseases of the esophagus from both medical and surgical viewpoints.

Alison Denby, publishing director for Oxford Journals, said, "We are greatly looking forward to a partnership with ISDE. It's a privilege to work with such an esteemed organization and to help Diseases of the Esophagus grow into the future. We're excited to expand DOTE's readership, and to help it attain a reputation as the premiere journal of esophageal study."

The two editors in chief (Neil Gupta & Giovanni Zaninotto), with the assistance of the Journal Editorial Board, manage over 400 manuscripts per year. In the last few years, Diseases of the Esophagus has increased its impact factor from 1.48 in 2010 to 2.14 in 2015. The journal is ranked in the third quartile amongst gastroenterological journals. The journal has increased the number of article downloads from 45,000 in 2010 to well over 65,000 in 2015.
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Oxford Journals is a division of Oxford University Press, which publishes over 300 academic and research journals covering a broad range of subject areas, two thirds of which are published in collaboration with learned societies and other international organizations. Oxford Journals has been publishing journals for more than a century and, as part of the world's largest university press, has more than 500 years of publishing expertise behind it.

ISDE was founded in 1979 with an aim to foster an international exchange of expertise and knowledge in the field. The Society has since grown to include over 500 members internationally, and continues to encourage the development and exchange of research, experience, and techniques concerning the treatment of esophageal disease.

Oxford University Press USA

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Oxford University Press to publish Diseases of the Esophagus
Oxford University Press and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus (ISDE) are pleased to announce their new partnership to publish Diseases of the Esophagus, ISDE's monthly scientific journal.
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