Human milk is a 'life-saving intervention' for infants with congenital heart disease

January 30, 2019

January 30, 2019 - With a lower risk of serious complications and improved feeding and growth outcomes, human milk is strongly preferred as the best diet for infants with congenital heart disease (CHD), according to a research review in Advances in Neonatal Care, official journal of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Jessica A. Davis, BSN, RN, CCRN, IBCLC, of UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh and Diane L. Spatz PhD, RN-BC, FAAN, of University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, reviewed and analyzed six studies on the benefits of human milk and breast-feeding for infants with CHD. They conclude, "Due to the overwhelming evidence of improved outcomes related to human milk feeing for critically ill infants, human milk should be considered a medical intervention for infants with CHD."

'Mother's Own Milk' Is Recommended Feeding for Babies with CHD.

Congenital heart disease is the most common category of birth defects, diagnosed in an estimated 1 in 1,000 newborns and infants each year. But while the benefits of human milk for premature and healthy infants are well documented, there is limited data on its role in improving outcomes for infants with CHD. The researchers examined evidence on the benefits of human milk on key outcomes for infants with CHD. "Human milk is important to protect the infant with CHD from infection, decrease the risk of NEC, improve feeding tolerance, and protect the infant's brain/improve developmental outcomes," Ms. Davis and Dr. Spatz write. Based on this evidence, they believe that healthcare professionals have an ethical duty to help families make an informed decision about feeding for their infant with CHD,

The authors outline Dr. Spatz's 10-step model to promote and protect human milk feeding and breastfeeding for infants with CHD. Recommendations include steps to ensure initiation and maintenance of the mother's milk supply, either by breastfeeding or pumping. If necessary, pasteurized donated human milk can serve as a bridge to the mother's own milk.

Other steps including ensuring skin-to-skin contact as soon as possible after birth and supporting mothers' ability to breastfeed and monitor their infant's milk intake and growth. For further information on the "10 Steps to Promote & Protect Human Milk and Breastfeeding in Vulnerable Infants," visit http://www.aannet.org/initiatives/edge-runners/profiles/edge-runners--10-steps-to-promote-and-protect-human-milk

"Human milk is a life-saving intervention for infants with CHD and health professionals must prioritize helping families to make an informed feeding decision and ensure that mothers of infants with CHD can reach their personal breastfeeding goals," states Dr. Spatz.
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Click here to read "Human Milk and Infants With Congenital Heart Disease"

DOI: 10.1097/ANC.0000000000000582

About Advances in Neonatal Care

Advances in Neonatal Care takes a unique and dynamic approach to the original research and clinical practice articles it publishes. Addressing the practice challenges faced every day--caring for the 40,000-plus low-birth-weight infants in Level II and Level III NICUs each year--the journal promotes evidence-based care and improved outcomes for the tiniest patients and their families. Peer-reviewed editorial includes unique and detailed visual and teaching aids, such as Family Teaching Toolbox, Research to Practice, Cultivating Clinical Expertise, and Online Features.

About the National Association of Neonatal Nurses

The National Association of Neonatal Nurses (NANN) is the longest established professional voice that supports the professional needs of neonatal nurses throughout their careers through excellence in practice, education, research and professional development. NANN is your neonatal connection to the strongest and most vibrant community of neonatal nurses.

About Wolters Kluwer

Wolters Kluwer is a global leader in professional information, software solutions, and services for the health, tax & accounting, finance, risk & compliance, and legal sectors. We help our customers make critical decisions every day by providing expert solutions that combine deep domain knowledge with specialized technology and services.

Wolters Kluwer, headquartered in the Netherlands, reported 2017 annual revenues of €4.4 billion. The company serves customers in over 180 countries, maintains operations in over 40 countries, and employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide.

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of trusted clinical technology and evidence-based solutions that engage clinicians, patients, researchers and students with advanced clinical decision support, learning and research and clinical intelligence. For more information about our solutions, visit http://healthclarity.wolterskluwer.com and follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter @WKHealth.

Wolters Kluwer Health

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