Feb. 1, 2005, Annals of Internal Medicine tip sheet

January 31, 2005

1. Task Force Recommends that Male Smokers Between the Ages of 65 and 75 Be Screened for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends a one-time ultrasound examination to screen for abdominal aortic aneurysm for men between the ages of 65 and 75 who are or have been smokers (Clinical Guidelines, p. 198 and 203).

This is the first time the Task Force has recommended screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm.

Estimates indicate that between 59 percent and 83 percent of patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms die before reaching the hospital and having surgery. New evidence has shown that screening and surgery to repair large abdominal aortic aneurysms reduces the number of deaths from ruptured aneurysm in men.

2. Study Finds One COX-2 Inhibitor Increases Risk of Heart Attack Even in People Who Have Not Had Heart Attacks

A study of health records of 113,927 elderly people who had never had a heart attack examined the relationship of use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and risk for heart attack.*

Researchers found that people who used rofecoxib had an increased risk for myocardial infarction. The risk was greater at higher doses.

They found that aspirin use offset the heart risk associated with low-dose but not high-dose rofecoxib. There was no evidence of increased heart risk with other NSAIDs. The researchers studied aspirin, naproxen, and meloxicam and the COX-2 inhibitors rofecoxib and celecoxib.

This study adds to the growing and consistent evidence that rofecoxib increases the risk of heart disease. It also contributes to the as yet inconsistent body of evidence about the heart risks of celecoxib: Some studies have shown increased risk and others have shown no increased risk.

*(This article is released online, along with the Feb. 1, 2005, issue of Annals of Internal Medicine. It will be published in the April 5, 2005, print edition.)

3. Many Pneumonia Patients Can Be Treated Safely and Successfully at Home

Pneumonia is one of the most important causes of death. A study of 203 patients with community-acquired pneumonia and low risk for dying found that about 80 percent of both those treated at home and those treated in the hospital improved without side effects, complications, or the need to change antibiotics (Article, p. 165).

Patients treated at home were more satisfied with their overall care.

The patients at low risk for complications were identified using a commonly used scoring system, the Pneumonia Severity Index.

An editorial writer says that the decision to treat a patient with community-acquired pneumonia at home or in the hospital is very important (Editorial, p. 215). Inpatient care is expensive, and outpatient care has some advantages in encouraging recovery.

The editorial writer says that the study findings, if confirmed, should stimulate emergency departments to systematize their approach to management of community-acquired pneumonia.

4. Large Medical Center Shows How It Used an Electronic Medical Record System to Alert Patients Within One Day of a Drug Withdrawal

(Improving Patient Care, p. 182; Editorial, p. 220.)
-end-
Annals of Internal Medicine is published by the American College of Physicians. These highlights are not intended to substitute for articles as sources of information.

American College of Physicians

Related Heart Attack Articles from Brightsurf:

Top Science Tip Sheet on heart failure, heart muscle cells, heart attack and atrial fibrillation results
Newly discovered pathway may have potential for treating heart failure - New research model helps predict heart muscle cells' impact on heart function after injury - New mass spectrometry approach generates libraries of glycans in human heart tissue - Understanding heart damage after heart attack and treatment may provide clues for prevention - Understanding atrial fibrillation's effects on heart cells may help find treatments - New research may lead to therapy for heart failure caused by ICI cancer medication

Molecular imaging identifies link between heart and kidney inflammation after heart attack
Whole body positron emission tomography (PET) has, for the first time, illustrated the existence of inter-organ communication between the heart and kidneys via the immune system following acute myocardial infarction.

Muscle protein abundant in the heart plays key role in blood clotting during heart attack
A prevalent heart protein known as cardiac myosin, which is released into the body when a person suffers a heart attack, can cause blood to thicken or clot--worsening damage to heart tissue, a new study shows.

New target identified for repairing the heart after heart attack
An immune cell is shown for the first time to be involved in creating the scar that repairs the heart after damage.

Heart cells respond to heart attack and increase the chance of survival
The heart of humans and mice does not completely recover after a heart attack.

A simple method to improve heart-attack repair using stem cell-derived heart muscle cells
The heart cannot regenerate muscle after a heart attack, and this can lead to lethal heart failure.

Mount Sinai discovers placental stem cells that can regenerate heart after heart attack
Study identifies new stem cell type that can significantly improve cardiac function.

Fixing a broken heart: Exploring new ways to heal damage after a heart attack
The days immediately following a heart attack are critical for survivors' longevity and long-term healing of tissue.

Heart patch could limit muscle damage in heart attack aftermath
Guided by computer simulations, an international team of researchers has developed an adhesive patch that can provide support for damaged heart tissue, potentially reducing the stretching of heart muscle that's common after a heart attack.

How the heart sends an SOS signal to bone marrow cells after a heart attack
Exosomes are key to the SOS signal that the heart muscle sends out after a heart attack.

Read More: Heart Attack News and Heart Attack Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.