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AGS statement on discrimination

January 31, 2017

Earlier this week, the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) issued the following statement on discrimination against healthcare professionals, caregivers, and older adults:

The American Geriatrics Society (AGS) opposes discrimination against healthcare professionals or older people based on race, color, religion, gender (including gender identity, sexual orientation, and pregnancy), disability, age, or national origin. We believe that such discriminatory practices can have a negative impact on public health, especially the health of older Americans and vulnerable older people.

We are particularly concerned about the impact on the healthcare workforce of the recent Executive Order (EO), "Protection of the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States," issued by the President of the United States on January 27, 2017. The EO imposes a 90-day suspension on visas and other immigration benefits for citizens of Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen attempting to travel to the United States.

The AGS values the significant contributions of health professionals from diverse backgrounds to the care of older people. For almost two decades, we have focused on helping health professionals better understand how to care for the diverse population of older adults. In addition, our international colleagues have advanced our understanding of how to care for older adults through contributions to our journals, meetings, and publications.

We oppose any federal order or legislation that unfairly singles out or targets health professionals and other members of the healthcare workforce because of race, color, religion, gender (including gender identity, sexual orientation, and pregnancy), disability, age, or national origin. Additionally, we oppose discrimination or disparate treatment of any kind in any healthcare setting because of race, color, religion, gender (including gender identity, sexual orientation, and pregnancy), disability, age, or national origin.
-end-
About the American Geriatrics Society

Founded in 1942, the AGS is a nationwide, not-for-profit society of geriatrics healthcare professionals that has -- for 75 years -- worked to improve the health, independence, and quality of life of older people. Our nearly 6,000 members include geriatricians, geriatric nurses, social workers, family practitioners, physician assistants, pharmacists, and internists. We provide leadership to healthcare professionals, policymakers, and the public by implementing and advocating for programs in patient care, research, professional and public education, and public policy. For more information, visit AmericanGeriatrics.org.

American Geriatrics Society

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