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Ozone watch

February 01, 2017

The 2016 Quadrennial Ozone Symposium (QOS-2016) was held on 4--9 September 2016 in Edinburgh, UK. The Symposium was organized by the International Ozone Commission (IO3C), the NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology and the University of Edinburgh, and was co-sponsored by the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, the International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences, and the World Meteorological Organization. More than 300 participants from 39 different countries attended the Symposium.

A report of the Symposium is published in the 3rd issue of 2017 in Advances in Atmospheric Sciences. It covers all issues related to Atmospheric Ozone, including trends of ozone in the stratosphere and troposphere, ozone-climate interactions, latest emerging techniques for ozone observations, and effects of ozone on human health, ecosystems and food production. Future challenges for stratospheric and tropospheric ozone are highlighted.

The report is also selected as the cover article of the issue. The cover shows different techniques for Ozone observations.
-end-


Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences

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From 2011 to 2015, California experienced its worst drought on record, with a parching combination of high temperatures and low precipitation.
New threat to ozone recovery
A new MIT study, published in Nature Geoscience, identifies another threat to the ozone layer's recovery: chloroform -- a colorless, sweet-smelling compound that is primarily used in the manufacturing of products such as Teflon and various refrigerants.
Ozone hole modest despite optimum conditions for ozone depletion
The ozone hole that forms in the upper atmosphere over Antarctica each September was slightly above average size in 2018, NOAA and NASA scientists reported today.
Increased UV from ozone depletion sterilizes trees
UC Berkeley paleobotanists put dwarf, bonsai pine trees in growth chambers and subjected them to up to 13 times the UV-B radiation Earth experiences today, simulating conditions that likely existed 252 million years ago during the planet's worst mass extinction.
Ozone at lower latitudes is not recovering, despite Antarctic ozone hole healing
The ozone layer -- which protects us from harmful ultraviolet radiation -- is recovering at the poles, but unexpected decreases in part of the atmosphere may be preventing recovery at lower latitudes.
The ozone layer continues to thin
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