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Ozone watch

February 01, 2017

The 2016 Quadrennial Ozone Symposium (QOS-2016) was held on 4--9 September 2016 in Edinburgh, UK. The Symposium was organized by the International Ozone Commission (IO3C), the NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology and the University of Edinburgh, and was co-sponsored by the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, the International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences, and the World Meteorological Organization. More than 300 participants from 39 different countries attended the Symposium.

A report of the Symposium is published in the 3rd issue of 2017 in Advances in Atmospheric Sciences. It covers all issues related to Atmospheric Ozone, including trends of ozone in the stratosphere and troposphere, ozone-climate interactions, latest emerging techniques for ozone observations, and effects of ozone on human health, ecosystems and food production. Future challenges for stratospheric and tropospheric ozone are highlighted.

The report is also selected as the cover article of the issue. The cover shows different techniques for Ozone observations.
-end-


Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences

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