Induced labor after 39 weeks in healthy women may reduce the need for cesarean birth

February 01, 2018

Approximately one-third of women in the United States give birth via cesarean delivery. While life-saving in the right circumstances, cesarean birth also carries with it significant risks, including an increased likelihood of infection, hysterectomy, placenta implantation abnormalities in future pregnancies, and respiratory illness in infants. In a study presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's (SMFM) annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting™, researchers unveiled findings that suggest that induction of labor at 39 weeks of gestation among healthy, first-time mothers reduces the rate of cesarean birth as compared to expectant management among the same population.

In a study with more than 6,100 pregnant women across the country, researchers randomly assigned half of the women to an expectant management group (waiting for labor to begin on its own and intervening only if problems occur) and the other half to a group that would undergo an elective induction (inducing labor without a medical reason) at 39 weeks of gestation. Results include:

"Safe reduction of the primary cesarean is an important strategy in improving birth outcomes," said William Grobman, MD, MBA, who presented today's findings and is professor in obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine. The research presented is part of, "A Randomized Trial of Induction Versus Expectant Management," more commonly referred to as the ARRIVE Trial, which was funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD).

SMFM's current guidelines do not recommend routine induction of labor for low-risk pregnant women at 39 weeks of gestation. "SMFM will wait to evaluate the peer-reviewed publication of the ARRIVE Trial before providing any guidance or changes to our existing recommendations," said Alfred Abuhamad, MD, the President of SMFM.
-end-


Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine

Related Pregnant Women Articles from Brightsurf:

Using artificial intelligence can improve pregnant women's health
Disorders such as congenital heart birth defects or macrosomia, gestational diabetes and preterm birth can be detected earlier when artificial intelligence is used.

Pregnant women's psychological health during the COVID-19 outbreak
A recent study that examined the psychological health of pregnant women during the COVID-19 outbreak uncovered fear and depression in many participants.

BAME women account for over half of pregnant women in UK hospitals with COVID-19
More than half of pregnant women recently admitted to a UK hospital with covid-19 infection were from black or other ethnic minority groups, finds a national surveillance study published by The BMJ today.

Pregnant women with depression are more than 3 times more likely to use cannabis
Cannabis use is much more common among pregnant women with depression and pregnant women with depression are more than 3 times more likely to use cannabis than those without depression.

Study paints picture of marijuana use in pregnant women
As marijuana is increasingly being legalized in US states, daily marijuana use among pregnant women is rising, despite evidence that this could harm their babies.

Homicide among pregnant, postpartum women in Louisiana
Researchers examined how often homicide was the cause of death among women in Louisiana who were pregnant or up to one year postpartum compared with other causes.

Are some antidepressants less risky for pregnant women?
About one in ten women in Qu├ębec will suffer from depression during pregnancy.

Pregnant women with HIV often not given recommended treatment
Women living with HIV who are also pregnant don't always receive recommended antiretroviral medications, according to a recent study.

Significantly fewer pregnant women take antidepressants
A pregnancy is not always a happy event and as many as 10-15% of pregnant women in Denmark have depressive symptoms.

Some pregnant women are exposed to gadolinium in early pregnancy
A small but concerning number of women are exposed to a commonly used MRI contrast agent early in their pregnancy, likely before many of them are aware that they're pregnant, according to a new study.

Read More: Pregnant Women News and Pregnant Women Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.