ASN statement in support of US Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010

February 02, 2011

Background: On January 31, The U.S. Department of Agriculture issued the US Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 to provide direction on making healthy food choices to maintain an ideal weight and improve overall health. The recommendations are issued every five years and serve as the basis for the food pyramid.

Position: The American Society of Nephrology (ASN) supports the recommendations, which include advising Americans to reduce their daily salt intake. The recommendations encourage nearly half of Americans to drastically reduce their salt intake. The following groups are urged to cut their salt intake to 1,500 milligrams of sodium daily:
  1. All individuals 51 and older;
  2. All African Americans; and
  3. Individuals with high blood pressure, diabetes or chronic kidney disease (CKD).

High blood pressure, or hypertension, is the second leading cause of kidney failure and poses a particular threat to African Americans. African Americans are six times as likely as whites to develop hypertension, and nearly 50% of African American adults are hypertensive.

"The recommendations are important to all Americans, particularly African Americans and patients with CKD. High dietary salt worsens kidney disease in a number of ways, including causing higher blood pressure and increasing the effects of hormones, such as angiotensin, known to injure kidneys. Reducing dietary salt should reduce the number of patients requiring renal replacement therapy," explains Stuart L. Linas, MD, FASN, Chair, ASN's Hypertension Advisory Group.

The recommendations advise the remaining 50% of Americans, not included in the above group, to cut their daily sodium intake by one-third to 2,300 milligrams per day to improve their health as well.
-end-
Contact: To speak with Dr. Stuart Linas or another member of ASN's Hypertension Advisory Group about ASN's support of the recent recommendations, please contact Shari Leventhal via email at sleventhal@asn-online.org or by phone at 202-416-0658.

Founded in 1966 and comprised of more than 12,000 members, the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) leads the fight against kidney disease by educating health professionals, sharing new knowledge, advancing research, and advocating the highest quality care for patients.

American Society of Nephrology

Related Hypertension Articles from Brightsurf:

Risk of target organ damage in patients with masked hypertension versus sustained hypertension
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.1261, Yue Wu, Guoyue Zhang, Rong Hu and Jianlin Du from The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China consider the risk of target organ damage in patients with masked hypertension versus sustained hypertension.

Overactive enzyme causes hereditary hypertension
After more than 40 years, several teams at the MDC and ECRC have now made a breakthrough discovery with the help of two animal models: they have proven that an altered gene encoding the enzyme PDE3A causes an inherited form of high blood pressure.

Diagnosing hypertension in children
Study results call into question the utility of testing blood pressure load--the proportion of elevated blood pressure readings detected over 24 hours--for diagnosing hypertension in children.

When the best treatment for hypertension is to wait
A new study concluded that a physician's decision not to intensify hypertension treatment is often a contextually appropriate choice.

Treatment of hypertension induced albuminuria
Patients with albuminuria will usually need more than one drug to achieve blood pressure control, particularly if the aim is also to reduce albuminuria.

Diagnosing and treating resistant hypertension
Resistant blood pressure affects 12 percent to 15 percent of people currently being treated for high blood pressure.

Dementia can be caused by hypertension
A new study in Cardiovascular Research indicates that patients with high blood pressure are at a higher risk of developing dementia.

Hormone imbalance causes treatment-resistant hypertension
British researchers have discovered a hormone imbalance that explains why it is very difficult to control blood pressure in around 10 per cent of hypertension patients.

Breastfeeding reduces hypertension risk
A study published in the American Journal of Hypertension indicates that women who breastfeed more children, and for longer periods of time, are less likely to suffer from hypertension after they reach menopause.

Lung cancer triggers pulmonary hypertension
Nearly half of all advanced-stage lung cancer patients develop arterial pulmonary hypertension.

Read More: Hypertension News and Hypertension Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.