Nav: Home

Protecting rice crops at no extra cost

February 02, 2017

A newly identified genetic mechanism in rice can be utilized to maintain resistance to a devastating disease, without causing the typical tradeoff - a decrease in grain yield, a new study reports. Rice blast is a serious fungal disease that can devastate rice crops. Yet, often genes that provide resistance to the pathogen compromise the yield of rice grains. Previously, researchers had identified a set of genes that enable high and durable resistance to the fungus. Here, Yiwen Deng explored these genes in greater detail, finding that PigmR was particularly effective, providing complete resistance to 50 rice blast variations. If PigmR is expressed while seeds are made, however, this hinders seed production and thus reduces yield, the authors report. They found that co-expression of another gene, PigmS, interferes with the resistance properties of PigmR. Intriguingly, in one strain of rice plants, PigmR was found to be expressed throughout the plant, while expression of PigmS was limited to the reproductive tissues, thus limiting the seed damage associated with PigmR. This site-specific suppression endows the plant with resistance to rice blast in its stem, stalk, leaves, without compromising yield. The researchers also identified specific amino acids that are involved in blocking the function of PigmR. These advancements could help boost protection of rice crops, without altering the rice production quantities.
-end-


American Association for the Advancement of Science

Related Genes Articles:

Insomnia genes found
An international team of researchers has found, for the first time, seven risk genes for insomnia.
Genes affecting our communication skills relate to genes for psychiatric disorder
By screening thousands of individuals, an international team led by researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, the University of Bristol, the Broad Institute and the iPSYCH consortium has provided new insights into the relationship between genes that confer risk for autism or schizophrenia and genes that influence our ability to communicate during the course of development.
The fate of Neanderthal genes
The Neanderthals disappeared about 30,000 years ago, but little pieces of them live on in the form of DNA sequences scattered through the modern human genome.
Face shape is in the genes
Many of the characteristics that make up a person's face, such as nose size and face width, stem from specific genetic variations, reports John Shaffer of the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania, and colleagues, in a study published on Aug.
Study finds hundreds of genes and genetic codes that regulate genes tied to alcoholism
Using rats carefully bred to either drink large amounts of alcohol or to spurn it, researchers at Indiana and Purdue universities have identified hundreds of genes that appear to play a role in increasing the desire to drink alcohol.
Reading between the genes
For a long time dismissed as 'junk DNA,' we now know that also the regions between the genes fulfill vital functions.
The silence of the genes
Research led by Dr. Keiji Tanimoto from the University of Tsukuba, Japan, has brought us closer to understanding the mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of genomic imprinting.
Why some genes are highly expressed
The DNA in our cells is folded into millions of small packets, like beads on a string, allowing our two-meter linear DNA genomes to fit into a nucleus of only about 0.01 mm in diameter.
Activating genes on demand
A new approach developed by Harvard geneticist George Church, Ph.D., can help uncover how tandem gene circuits dictate life processes, such as the healthy development of tissue or the triggering of a particular disease, and can also be used for directing precision stem cell differentiation for regenerative medicine and growing organ transplants.
Controlling genes with light
Researchers at Duke University have demonstrated a new way to activate genes with light, allowing precisely controlled and targeted genetic studies and applications.

Related Genes Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Changing The World
What does it take to change the world for the better? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on activism—what motivates it, why it matters, and how each of us can make a difference. Guests include civil rights activist Ruby Sales, labor leader and civil rights activist Dolores Huerta, author Jeremy Heimans, "craftivist" Sarah Corbett, and designer and futurist Angela Oguntala.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#521 The Curious Life of Krill
Krill may be one of the most abundant forms of life on our planet... but it turns out we don't know that much about them. For a create that underpins a massive ocean ecosystem and lives in our oceans in massive numbers, they're surprisingly difficult to study. We sit down and shine some light on these underappreciated crustaceans with Stephen Nicol, Adjunct Professor at the University of Tasmania, Scientific Advisor to the Association of Responsible Krill Harvesting Companies, and author of the book "The Curious Life of Krill: A Conservation Story from the Bottom of the World".