Changes in economic prosperity, cardiovascular mortality

February 02, 2021

What The Study Did:
County-level mortality and economic data were used to investigate the association between changes in economic prosperity and rates of cardiovascular mortality among middle-age U.S. adults from 2010 to 2017.

Authors:
Sameed Ahmed M. Khatana, M.D., M.P.H., of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study:
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(doi:10.1001/jama.2020.26141)

Editor's Note: The article includes conflicts of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflict of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.
-end-
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