Nav: Home

Advancement in tissue engineering promotes oral wound healing

February 03, 2009

Tampa, Fla. (Feb. 3rd, 2009) - Oral tissue engineering for transplantation to aid wound healing in mouth (oral cavity) reconstruction has taken a significant step forward with a Netherlands-based research team's successful development of a gum tissue (gingival) substitute that can be used for reconstruction in the oral cavity. Their work was reported in the current issue of Cell Transplantation (17:10/11).

According to the study's lead author, Dr. Susan Gibbs of the VU University Medical Centre in Amsterdam, skin substitutes have been far more advanced than oral gingiva substitutes and, until now, no oral tissue-engineered products have been available for clinical applications. The team was the first to develop an autologous (same patient) full thickness skin substitute that Dr. Gibbs says is "proving to be very successful." However, they wanted to develop an autologous, full thickness oral substitute with the correct oral characteristics.

"Reconstructive surgery within the oral cavity is required during tumor excision, cleft palate repair, trauma, repair of diseased tissue and for generating soft tissue around teeth and dental implants," explained Dr. Gibbs. "Drawbacks of using skin as an autograft material in the oral cavity include bulkiness, sweating and hair formation and the limited amount of donor tissue available."

Their current study was aimed at constructing analogous, full-thickness oral substitutes in a similar manner to their skin substitute while maintaining the needed characteristics for successful oral transplantation. They used small amounts of patient oral tissue obtained from biopsies, then cultured and expanded the tissues in vitro over a three-week period.

Results of their study with a small number of patients showed that the gingiva substitute was "promising" and supported the need to carry out a larger patient study in the future.

"This study emphasized the importance of closely matching the donor site with the area to be transplanted," said Dr. Gibbs. "Our results represent a large step forward in the area of clinical applications in oral tissue engineering which, until now, have lagged behind skin tissue engineering."

"The reported study provides great encouragement in the clinical setting, for the ability to repair gingivitis and other gum diseases that affect a large number of people" said Dr. Amit Patel, a section editor of the journal Cell Transplantation.
-end-
Contact: Dr. Susan Gibbs, Department of Dermatology, VU University Medical Centre, De Boelelaan 1118, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands Tel: 0031 20 4442815 s.gibbs@vumc.nl

The editorial offices for CELL TRANSPLANTATION are at the Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair, College of Medicine, the University of South Florida and the Diabetes Research Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. Contact David Eve, Ph.D. at deve@health.usf.edu or Camillo Ricordi, MD at ricordi@miami.edu

News Release by Randolph Fillmore, Florida Science Communications.

Cell Transplantation Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair

Related Transplantation Articles:

Study provides clues to improving fecal microbiota transplantation
Results from a placebo-controlled trial provide a strategy for improving fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection.
Brazil faces major challenges in liver transplantation
A recent analysis indicates that more than 1,700 liver transplantations are performed annually in Brazil.
These days fecal transplantation is no joke
Fecal transplants are increasingly being used to treat certain human illnesses and there has been a dramatic increase in animal experiments involving fecal material.
Transplantation and cell therapy
Key leaders in the field of cellular therapy will highlight new applications to potentially cure patients with blood diseases and infections on the occasion of the 5th Cell Therapy Day.
Elsevier announces the launch of Transplantation Reports
Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical, and medical information products and services today announces the launch of Transplantation Reports, a new online-only open access journal covering all areas of transplantation.
Common cause for complications after kidney transplantation identified
The BK polyomavirus often causes complications after kidney transplantation. The research group of Professor Hans H.
Uterine transplantation: Subjects have 'adjusted well to their new life situation'
In October last year the Gothenburg, Sweden, group of Mats Brannstrom announced the world's first live birth following the transplantation of a donated uterus.
The road to successful uterus transplantation to restore fertility
Swedish clinicians recently reported the first live birth after uterus transplantation, which was followed by two more uneventful births and another pregnancy that is near term.
After lung transplantation: Go back to work and feel better
In an original article in Deutsches Ă„rzteblatt International, Hendrik Suhling and coauthors report the findings of the first study ever performed in Germany on the percentage of lung-transplant patients who resume employment after transplantation and the reasons that keep the others from going back to work.
Size of biomarker associated with improved survival following transplantation
Among patients with severe aplastic anemia who received stem cell transplant from an unrelated donor, longer leukocyte (white blood cells) telomere length (a structure at the end of a chromosome) was associated with increased overall survival at five years, according to a study in the Feb.

Related Transplantation Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#SB2 2019 Science Birthday Minisode: Mary Golda Ross
Our second annual Science Birthday is here, and this year we celebrate the wonderful Mary Golda Ross, born 9 August 1908. She died in 2008 at age 99, but left a lasting mark on the science of rocketry and space exploration as an early woman in engineering, and one of the first Native Americans in engineering. Join Rachelle and Bethany for this very special birthday minisode celebrating Mary and her achievements. Thanks to our Patreons who make this show possible! Read more about Mary G. Ross: Interview with Mary Ross on Lash Publications International, by Laurel Sheppard Meet Mary Golda...