Nav: Home

Bariatric surgery can benefit some obese children and teens, reports Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition

February 05, 2015

February 5, 2015 CORRECTION NOTICE:

An error was found in this Publish Ahead of Print article study data's BMI recommendations; the correction has been made to the original online Publish Ahead of Print article and is reflected in this updated press release.

January 19,2015 - Bariatric surgery--as a last resort when conservative interventions have failed--can improve liver disease and other obesity-related health problems in severely obese children and adolescents, according to a position paper in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, official journal of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

But because of the potential for serious complications, an expert panel recommends that bariatric surgery be reserved for carefully selected subgroups of young children with severe or morbid obesity and associated medical conditions. The recommendations appear in a new position paper authored by the ESPGHAN Hepatology Committee, under the leadership of Prof Valerio Nobili of Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, Rome.

Bariatric Surgery in Children--Experts Review the Evidence

The Committee--made up of 12 European specialists in pediatric liver disease--was tasked with reviewing and analyzing the available evidence on bariatric surgery for obese children and adolescents. The epidemic of childhood obesity has brought an increase in obesity-related diseases, including type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Weight reduction through lifestyle change and diet is the best treatment for these conditions--however, the long-term results are often disappointing.

This has led to growing interest in bariatric surgery as an alternative for weight reduction in children and adolescents. Although studies are limited, "Recent evidence suggests that in carefully selected patients an early intervention by bariatric surgery can strongly reduce the risk of adulthood obesity and obesity-related diseases, including NAFLD," Prof Nobili and colleagues write.

Yet the appropriate use of bariatric surgery in pediatric patients remains unclear--mainly because of limited research data and the known risks of the procedure. Based on the available evidence and expert opinion, the position paper outlines a standardized approach to considering bariatric surgery in children and adolescents.

Statement Recommends Limited Use and Careful Patient Selection

Specifically, the ESPGHAN Hepatology Committee states that bariatric surgery should be limited to two groups of pediatric patients: those with body mass of 40 or higher with severe NAFLD or other obesity-related medical conditions; and those with body mass index 50 or higher and mild medical conditions.

Several additional factors must be taken into account when considering bariatric surgery, including the patient's physical and psychological maturity, desire to undergo the procedure, previous attempts at weight loss, and ability to comply with follow-up medical care. The position statement outlines the preoperative patient evaluation and procedures for obtaining informed consent.

The Committee also addresses the issue of which type of bariatric surgery should be performed. Gastric bypass procedures (especially "Roux-en-Y" gastric bypass) are most commonly used, in pediatric as in adult patients. However, concerns over the complex nutritional deficiencies occurring after these surgical procedures have limited their use in children and adolescents.

Temporary devices, such as an intragastric balloon, are appealing for use in younger patients, as the effects are fully reversible. However, there are limited data on the use of these procedures in adolescents. The same is true for alternative procedures such as laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding and sleeve gastrectomy. All of these approaches should be considered investigational in pediatric patients, according to the new statement.

"Future studies and a long-term risk analysis of patients with obesity associated liver disease are much needed to clarify the exact indications for bariatric surgery in adolescents," the Committee concludes. Until formal outcome studies are performed, they propose the "rigorous collection" of data on any and all children and adolescents undergoing any type of weight loss procedure.
-end-
Click here to read "Indications and Limitations of Bariatric Intervention in Severely Obese Children and Adolescents With and Without Non-alcoholic Steatohepatitis: the ESPGHAN Hepatology Committee Position Statement."

Article: Indications and Limitations of Bariatric Intervention in Severely Obese Children and Adolescents With and Without Non-alcoholic Steatohepatitis: the ESPGHAN Hepatology Committee Position Statement. (doi: 10.1097/MPG.0000000000000715)

About The Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition

The Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition provides a forum for original papers and reviews dealing with pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition, including normal and abnormal functions of the alimentary tract and its associated organs, including the salivary glands, pancreas, gallbladder, and liver. Particular emphasis is on development and its relation to infant and childhood nutrition.

About Wolters Kluwer Health

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information, business intelligence and point-of-care solutions for the healthcare industry. Serving more than 150 countries worldwide, clinicians rely on Wolters Kluwer Health's market leading information-enabled tools and software solutions throughout their professional careers from training to research to practice. Major brands include Health Language®, Lexicomp®, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Medicom®, Medknow, Ovid®, Pharmacy OneSource®, ProVation® Medical and UpToDate®.

Wolters Kluwer Health is part of Wolters Kluwer, a market-leading global information services company. Wolters Kluwer had 2013 annual revenues of €3.6 billion ($4.7 billion), employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide, and maintains operations in over 40 countries across Europe, North America, Asia Pacific, and Latin America.maintains operations in over 40 countries across Europe, North America, Asia Pacific, and Latin America. Wolters Kluwer is headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands. Its shares are quoted on Euronext Amsterdam (WKL) and are included in the AEX and Euronext 100 indices. Wolters Kluwer has a sponsored Level 1 American Depositary Receipt program. The ADRs are traded on the over-the-counter market in the U.S. (WTKWY).

Follow our official Twitter handle: @WKHealth.

Wolters Kluwer Health

Related Obesity Articles:

Changing the debate around obesity
The UK's National Health Service (NHS) needs to do more to address the ingrained stigma and discrimination faced by people with obesity, says a leading health psychologist.
Study links longer exposure to obesity and earlier development of obesity to increased risk of type 2 diabetes
Cumulative exposure to obesity could be at least as important as actually being obese in terms of risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D), concludes new research published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]).
How much do obesity and addictions overlap?
A large analysis of personality studies has found that people with obesity behave somewhat like people with addictions to alcohol or drugs.
Should obesity be recognized as a disease?
With obesity now affecting almost a third (29%) of the population in England, and expected to rise to 35% by 2030, should we now recognize it as a disease?
Is obesity associated with risk of pediatric MS?
A single-center study of 453 children in Germany with multiple sclerosis (MS) investigated the association of obesity with pediatric MS risk and with the response of first-line therapy in children with MS.
Women with obesity prior to conception are more likely to have children with obesity
A systematic review and meta-analysis identified significantly increased odds of child obesity when mothers have obesity before conception, according to a study published June 11, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Nicola Heslehurst of Newcastle University in the UK, and colleagues.
Obesity medicine association announces major updates to its adult obesity algorithm
The Obesity Medicine Association (OMA) announced the immediate availability of the 2019 OMA Adult Obesity Algorithm, with new information for clinicians including the relationship between Obesity and Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, Dyslipidemia, and Cancer; information on investigational Anti-Obesity Pharmacotherapy; treatments for Lipodystrophy; and Pharmacokinetics and Obesity.
Systematic review shows risk of a child developing overweight or obesity is more than trebled by maternal obesity prior to pregnancy
New research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Glasgow, Scotland (April 28- May 1) reveals that the risk of a child becoming overweight or obese is more than trebled by maternal obesity prior to getting pregnant.
Eating later in the day may be associated with obesity
Eating later in the day may contribute to weight gain, according to a new study to be presented Saturday at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La.
How obesity affects vitamin D metabolism
A new Journal of Bone and Mineral Research study confirms that vitamin D supplementation is less effective in the presence of obesity, and it uncovers a biological mechanism to explain this observation.
More Obesity News and Obesity Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Making Amends
What makes a true apology? What does it mean to make amends for past mistakes? This hour, TED speakers explore how repairing the wrongs of the past is the first step toward healing for the future. Guests include historian and preservationist Brent Leggs, law professor Martha Minow, librarian Dawn Wacek, and playwright V (formerly Eve Ensler).
Now Playing: Science for the People

#566 Is Your Gut Leaking?
This week we're busting the human gut wide open with Dr. Alessio Fasano from the Center for Celiac Research and Treatment at Massachusetts General Hospital. Join host Anika Hazra for our discussion separating fact from fiction on the controversial topic of leaky gut syndrome. We cover everything from what causes a leaky gut to interpreting the results of a gut microbiome test! Related links: Center for Celiac Research and Treatment website and their YouTube channel
Now Playing: Radiolab

The Flag and the Fury
How do you actually make change in the world? For 126 years, Mississippi has had the Confederate battle flag on their state flag, and they were the last state in the nation where that emblem remained "officially" flying.  A few days ago, that flag came down. A few days before that, it coming down would have seemed impossible. We dive into the story behind this de-flagging: a journey involving a clash of histories, designs, families, and even cheerleading. This show is a collaboration with OSM Audio. Kiese Laymon's memoir Heavy is here. And the Hospitality Flag webpage is here.