Nav: Home

Researchers use artificial neural networks to streamline materials testing

February 05, 2019

BROOKLYN, New York, Monday, February 4, 2019 - Optimizing advanced composites for specific end uses can be costly and time consuming, requiring manufacturers to test many samples to arrive at the best formulation. Investigators at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering have designed a machine learning system employing artificial neural networks (ANN) capable of extrapolating from data derived from just one sample, thereby quickly formulating and providing analytics on theoretical graphene-enhanced advanced composites.

The work, led by Nikhil Gupta, associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at NYU Tandon, with Ph.D. student Xianbo Xu and collaborators at 2D graphene materials manufacturer GrapheneCa, is detailed in "Artificial Neural Network Approach to Predict the Elastic Modulus from Dynamic Mechanical Analysis Results," which will be featured on the inside cover of the journal Advanced Theory and Simulations.

Tensile tests and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) are widely used to characterize the viscoelastic properties of materials at different loading rates and temperatures. But this requires an elaborate experimental campaign involving a large number of samples.

The Tandon team found a way to bypass this process by designing an ANN-based approach that builds a model and then feeds it data from DMA -- a test of a material's response to a given temperature and loading frequency (a measure of load applied in cycles) -- to predict how it will respond to any other temperature and pressure combination. Gupta explained that ANN extrapolated from measures of samples' ability to store and dissipate energy under different conditions.

"Testing materials under different conditions during the product development cycle is a major cost for manufacturers who are trying to create composites for numerous applications," noted Gupta. "This system allows us to conduct one test and then predict the properties under other conditions. It therefore considerably reduces the amount of experimentation needed."

"Applying an artificial neural network approach to predict the properties of nanocomposites can help in developing an approach where modeling can guide the material and application development and reduce the cost over time," continued Gupta.

"Working with the researchers at NYU Tandon's Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, we have developed a new method for predicting the behavior of thermosetting nanocomposites over a wide range of temperature and loading rates," said Dr. Sergey Voskresensky, Head of Research & Development at GrapheneCa's New York-based production facility. "Furthermore, the same approach can potentially be applied to predict a behavior of thermoplastic materials. This is a critical step towards advanced composite production."
-end-
This research was supported by grants from the U.S. Office of Naval Research.

"Artificial Neural Network Approach to Predict the Elastic Modulus from Dynamic Mechanical Analysis Results," is available at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/adts.201800131

About the New York University Tandon School of Engineering

The NYU Tandon School of Engineering dates to 1854, the founding date for both the New York University School of Civil Engineering and Architecture and the Brooklyn Collegiate and Polytechnic Institute (widely known as Brooklyn Poly). A January 2014 merger created a comprehensive school of education and research in engineering and applied sciences, rooted in a tradition of invention and entrepreneurship and dedicated to furthering technology in service to society. In addition to its main location in Brooklyn, NYU Tandon collaborates with other schools within NYU, one of the country's foremost private research universities, and is closely connected to engineering programs at NYU Abu Dhabi and NYU Shanghai. It operates Future Labs focused on start-up businesses in downtown Manhattan and Brooklyn and an award-winning online graduate program. For more information, visit http://engineering.nyu.edu.

NYU Tandon School of Engineering

Related Engineering Articles:

Engineering the meniscus
Damage to the meniscus is common, but there remains an unmet need for improved restorative therapies that can overcome poor healing in the avascular regions.
Artificially engineering the intestine
Short bowel syndrome is a debilitating condition with few treatment options, and these treatments have limited efficacy.
Reverse engineering the fireworks of life
An interdisciplinary team of Princeton researchers has successfully reverse engineered the components and sequence of events that lead to microtubule branching.
New method for engineering metabolic pathways
Two approaches provide a faster way to create enzymes and analyze their reactions, leading to the design of more complex molecules.
Engineering for high-speed devices
A research team from the University of Delaware has developed cutting-edge technology for photonics devices that could enable faster communications between phones and computers.
Breakthrough in blood vessel engineering
Growing functional blood vessel networks is no easy task. Previously, other groups have made networks that span millimeters in size.
Next-gen batteries possible with new engineering approach
Dramatically longer-lasting, faster-charging and safer lithium metal batteries may be possible, according to Penn State research, recently published in Nature Energy.
What can snakes teach us about engineering friction?
If you want to know how to make a sneaker with better traction, just ask a snake.
Engineering a plastic-eating enzyme
Scientists have engineered an enzyme which can digest some of our most commonly polluting plastics, providing a potential solution to one of the world's biggest environmental problems.
A new way to do metabolic engineering
University of Illinois researchers have created a novel metabolic engineering method that combines transcriptional activation, transcriptional interference, and gene deletion, and executes them simultaneously, making the process faster and easier.
More Engineering News and Engineering Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Accessing Better Health
Essential health care is a right, not a privilege ... or is it? This hour, TED speakers explore how we can give everyone access to a healthier way of life, despite who you are or where you live. Guests include physician Raj Panjabi, former NYC health commissioner Mary Bassett, researcher Michael Hendryx, and neuroscientist Rachel Wurzman.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#544 Prosperity Without Growth
The societies we live in are organised around growth, objects, and driving forward a constantly expanding economy as benchmarks of success and prosperity. But this growing consumption at all costs is at odds with our understanding of what our planet can support. How do we lower the environmental impact of economic activity? How do we redefine success and prosperity separate from GDP, which politicians and governments have focused on for decades? We speak with ecological economist Tim Jackson, Professor of Sustainable Development at the University of Surrey, Director of the Centre for the Understanding of Sustainable Propserity, and author of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

An Announcement from Radiolab