Association of parent, family stressors with screen exposure among toddlers

February 05, 2020

What The Study Did: This population-based study explored associations between parent and family stressors, such as parenting stress and lower household income, with child screen exposure and screen use paired with feeding in toddlers.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

Authors: Katherine Tombeau Cost, Ph.D., of the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, is the corresponding author.

(10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.20557)

Editor's Note: The article includes conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
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Media advisory: The full study is linked to this news release.

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About JAMA Network Open: JAMA Network Open is the new online-only open access general medical journal from the JAMA Network. Every Wednesday and Friday, the journal publishes peer-reviewed clinical research and commentary in more than 40 medical and health subject areas. Every article is free online from the day of publication.

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