OU psychology professor recipient of early career impact award

February 06, 2017

A University of Oklahoma psychology professor, Edward Cokely, is the recipient of a 2017 Early Career Impact Award from the Federation of Associations in Behavioral & Brain Sciences. FABBS is a coalition of 19 professional societies representing more than 150,000 scientists worldwide. Cokely, a Presidential Research Professor and associate professor of psychology in the OU College of Arts and Sciences, is one of six scientists who received the 2017 award honoring early career professionals for major contributions to the science of mind, brain and behavior.

"It is a great tribute to Professor Cokely that he is one of only six recipients of this award in the entire nation," said OU President David L. Boren.

Cokely has made significant advances in the psychology of skilled decision making, with applications in risk communication and adaptive technology. He is recognized as one of the world's foremost experts on risk literacy and inclusive decision education. His research has advanced frontiers in the scientific understanding of user-friendly decision support, visual aids and training programs, including adaptive computerized tutors designed to improve high-stakes decision making of diverse and vulnerable individuals who vary widely in ability, proficiency, education background and country of residence.

"Receipt of this highly competitive award clearly indicates the quality and impact of Dr. Cokely's research, and we are most fortunate to have him at OU," said Kelvin Droegemeier, vice president for research.

Cokely led the international research team that developed the Berlin Numeracy Test at the Max Planck Institute and co-founded http://www.RiskLiteracy.org, the multinational "science for society" project involving research groups from 28 universities in 13 countries. Today more than 100,000 people from 166 countries have taken one of the Berlin Numeracy Tests. Hundreds of recent studies by researchers in business, psychology, economics, political science, law, medicine, social work, forestry and other fields have published decision-making research using Berlin Numeracy Tests, improving understanding of the needs and processes of diverse decision makers in more than 50 countries.

"The award reflects the courage and sacrifice of so many brilliant collaborators, students and mentors. Words just can't express my gratitude," said Cokely.

In less than 10 years after earning his doctorate degree from Florida State University, Cokely has published more than 60 papers which have been cited in excess of 2,000 times. He has mentored 10 doctoral students and secured more than $2 million in funding for research and student support. His research has been featured in Scientific American, New Scientist magazine, Chronicle of Higher Education and other media outlets, such as The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal online. He has received major awards like the 2013 National Science Foundation CAREER Award and the American Psychology Association's Award for Best Research Paper in Applied Psychology in 2012.

Cokely is co-founding faculty of the National Institute for Risk & Resilience, an umbrella organization that facilitates collaboration among OU research centers, individual scholars and external partners on risk-related teaching, research and outreach.
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University of Oklahoma

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