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Chemtrails vs. contrails (video)

February 06, 2018

WASHINGTON, Feb. 6, 2018 -- It's easy to look at the white trail behind a jet aircraft and imagine all manner of chemicals raining down from above. However, airplane contrails are simply what happens when jet engines burn fuel. In this video, Reactions explains the straightforward chemistry of contrails: https://youtu.be/ZonPvpgcBc0.
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