Nav: Home

New VaxArray publication on influenza neuraminidase quantification

February 06, 2019

BOULDER COLORADO (1/29/19) -- InDevR Inc. announced publication of "A Neuraminidase Potency Assay for Quantitative Assessment of Neuraminidase in Influenza Vaccines" in npj Vaccines. The manuscript focuses on accuracy and precision for the VaxArray Influenza Seasonal Neuraminidase assay as tested to ICH guidelines. The new VaxArray kit is poised to help improve influenza vaccines by empowering manufacturers with a standardized method to meet current regulatory requirements and to prepare for future trends. The VaxArray NA kit is also expected to serve as an important new tool in the push for a more broadly protective or "universal" flu vaccine.

For example, PATH is a non-profit organization working toward sustainable production of high-quality, affordable seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines in developing countries - including innovative broadly protective influenza vaccines. According to Dr. Francesco Berlanda Scorza, Director of Vaccine Development at PATH:

"Improving our understanding the role of neuraminidase is an important component of this effort of improving influenza vaccines. Together with studying the immune response elicited by influenza vaccines against HA, we are interested in understanding the potential contribution of NA, as we believe this might lead to more effective seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines. The latest publication on the VaxArray NA assay demonstrates its potential to greatly accelerate our ability to track NA. Indeed, we are currently exploiting this platform to characterize the NA content in a pre-pandemic whole virion H5N1 vaccine candidate."

For today's seasonal influenza vaccines, the level of neuraminidase (NA) in flu vaccines is not currently regulated but its "presence and type must be confirmed by suitable enzymatic or immunological methods" during vaccine manufacturing. Since no standardized method exists, vaccine producers each implement their own approach and many use non-influenza specific enzymatic activity assays. The VaxArray Influenza Seasonal NA kit is based on N1, N2, and B-NA subtype-specific monoclonal antibodies arrayed for use in a simple, multiplexed immunoassay. The assay is quantitative, highly correlated with enzymatic activity, stability indicating, and has been demonstrated to serve as a proxy for immunogenicity for a monovalent H3N2 vaccine (see Vaccine 36 (2018) 2937-2945).
-end-
InDevR also offers VaxArray potency assays for influenza hemagglutinin and nucleoprotein. Find more information about the entire VaxArray product line at: https://indevr.com/products/vaxarray/

About InDevR

InDevR has a demonstrated commitment to innovative solutions for the life science industry. With focus on enhancing vaccines and other biotherapeutics, InDevR is a leader in progressive new analytical technologies that enable accelerated development and manufacturing of these life-saving products. For more information about the company and products, please visit http://www.indevr.com or call 303-402-9100.

MEDIA CONTACT

Shannon Rodriguez
InDevR
+1-303-402-9100
rodriguez@indevr.com

InDevR, Inc.

Related Vaccine Articles:

Coronavirus Vaccine: Where are we and what's next? (video)
You might have heard that COVID-19 vaccine trials are underway in Seattle.
Why isn't there a vaccine for staph?
A study from Washington University School of Medicine in St.
Exposing vaccine hesitant to real-life pain of diseases makes them more pro-vaccine
New research from Brigham Young University professors finds there is a better way to help increase support for vaccinations: Expose people to the pain and suffering caused by vaccine-preventable diseases instead of trying to combat people with vaccine facts.
Lifetime flu vaccine?
Another year, another flu vaccine because so far scientists haven't managed to make a vaccine that protects against all strains of flu.
On the horizon: An acne vaccine
A new study published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology reports important steps that have been taken towards the development of an acne vaccine.
Study examines first birth cohort to receive HPV vaccine: The vaccine works
Girls in the first birth cohort to be offered and receive the HPV vaccine showed a lower degree of dysplasia which may eventually lead to cervical cancer than a birth cohort from 1983.
False beliefs about MMR vaccine found to influence acceptance of Zika vaccine
People's willingness to use a Zika vaccine, once it's available, will be influenced by how they weigh the risks associated with the disease and the vaccine, but also by their misconceptions about other vaccines.
Would you pay for an Ebola vaccine? Most say yes.
George Mason University researchers conducted a study during the height of the 2014-2016 Ebola epidemic and found that a majority of participants (59.7 percent) would pay at least $1 for a vaccine.
How well will the flu vaccine work this winter?
Scientists from UTMB and Biomed Protection predicted which H3N2 variants would become 'vaccine resistant', and this prediction has been confirmed during the 2017 Australian flu season.
Virus-like particle vaccine protects against RSV vaccine-enhanced respiratory disease, study finds
Researchers have discovered that a virus-like particle vaccine can prime the body's immune response and prevent the severe respiratory disease that results when patients given an early form of a vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are exposed to RSV, according to a study led by Georgia State University.
More Vaccine News and Vaccine Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans 2.0
More than test scores or good grades–what do kids need for the future? This hour, TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, both during and after this time of crisis. Guests include educators Richard Culatta and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#556 The Power of Friendship
It's 2020 and times are tough. Maybe some of us are learning about social distancing the hard way. Maybe we just are all a little anxious. No matter what, we could probably use a friend. But what is a friend, exactly? And why do we need them so much? This week host Bethany Brookshire speaks with Lydia Denworth, author of the new book "Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond". This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Space
One of the most consistent questions we get at the show is from parents who want to know which episodes are kid-friendly and which aren't. So today, we're releasing a separate feed, Radiolab for Kids. To kick it off, we're rerunning an all-time favorite episode: Space. In the 60's, space exploration was an American obsession. This hour, we chart the path from romance to increasing cynicism. We begin with Ann Druyan, widow of Carl Sagan, with a story about the Voyager expedition, true love, and a golden record that travels through space. And astrophysicist Neil de Grasse Tyson explains the Coepernican Principle, and just how insignificant we are. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.