Nav: Home

Electron-gun simulations explain the mechanisms of high-energy cosmic rays

February 06, 2019

A new study published in EPJ D provides a rudimentary model for simulating cosmic rays' collisions with planets by looking at the model of electrons detached from a negative ion using photons. In this work, Chinese physicists have for the first time demonstrated that they can control the dynamics of negative ion detachment via photons, or photodetachment, on a moving surface.

When cosmic rays collide with planets or debris, they lose energy. Scientists use the collision of electrons with a moving surface to simulate this process. A new study published in EPJ D provides a rudimentary model for simulating cosmic rays' collisions with planets by looking at the model of electrons detached from a negative ion by photons. In this work, Chinese physicists have for the first time demonstrated that they can control the dynamics of negative ion detachment via photons, or photodetachment, on a moving surface. De-hua Wang from Ludong University, Yantai, China, and colleagues have developed mathematical equations and computer simulations showing that the chance of such photodetachment occurring depends on the electron's energy and the speed of the moving surface. For this purpose, negative ions, such as chloride (Cl-) or hydrogen (H-) ions, are considered a good source of electrons, as they are made up of one electron loosely bound by a short-ranged energy potential to the neutral atom. Such ions can be made into electron guns under a strong electric field capable of scraping electrons away--thus helping to model electrically charged cosmic rays.

These electron guns generate interference patterns. Indeed, this is triggered by the detached electron wave returning back to the ion's nucleus due to the effect of the external fields interfering with the new electron wave. As the speed of the moving surface reaches a certain threshold, its effect on the chances of photodetachment taking place becomes significant.

The authors also found that the moving surface's effect on the photodetachment of Chloride (Cl-) ions is less pronounced compared to hydrogen (H-) ions.
-end-
Reference

D. Wang, X. Sun and T. Shi (2019) Photodetachment dynamics of negative ions near a moving surface, European Physical Journal D 73: 15, DOI: 10.1140/epjd/e2018-90415-1

Springer

Related Planets Articles:

Ultracool dwarf and the 7 planets
Astronomers have found a system of seven Earth-sized planets just 40 light-years away.
ALMA measures size of seeds of planets
Researchers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), have for the first time, achieved a precise size measurement of small dust particles around a young star through radio-wave polarization.
Origin of minor planets' rings revealed
A team of researchers has clarified the origin of the rings recently discovered around two minor planets known as centaurs, and their results suggest the existence of rings around other centaurs.
Are planets setting the sun's pace?
The sun's activity is determined by the sun's magnetic field.
A better way to learn if alien planets have the right stuff
A new method for analyzing the chemical composition of stars may help scientists winnow the search for Earth 2.0.
A new Goldilocks for habitable planets
The search for habitable, alien worlds needs to make room for a second 'Goldilocks,' according to a Yale University researcher.
Probing giant planets' dark hydrogen
Hydrogen is the most-abundant element in the universe, but there is still so much we have to learn about it.
Universe's first life might have been born on carbon planets
Our Earth consists of silicate rocks and an iron core with a thin veneer of water and life.
Number of habitable planets could be limited by stifling atmospheres
New research has revealed that fewer than predicted planets may be capable of harbouring life because their atmospheres keep them too hot.
Footprints of baby planets in a gas disk
A new analysis of the ALMA data for a young star HL Tauri provides yet more firm evidence of baby planets around the star.

Related Planets Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Changing The World
What does it take to change the world for the better? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on activism—what motivates it, why it matters, and how each of us can make a difference. Guests include civil rights activist Ruby Sales, labor leader and civil rights activist Dolores Huerta, author Jeremy Heimans, "craftivist" Sarah Corbett, and designer and futurist Angela Oguntala.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#521 The Curious Life of Krill
Krill may be one of the most abundant forms of life on our planet... but it turns out we don't know that much about them. For a create that underpins a massive ocean ecosystem and lives in our oceans in massive numbers, they're surprisingly difficult to study. We sit down and shine some light on these underappreciated crustaceans with Stephen Nicol, Adjunct Professor at the University of Tasmania, Scientific Advisor to the Association of Responsible Krill Harvesting Companies, and author of the book "The Curious Life of Krill: A Conservation Story from the Bottom of the World".