Impact of acne relapses on quality of life and productivity

February 06, 2019

In a study of teenagers and adults suffering from acne who consulted their dermatologist, the acne relapse rate was 44 percent (39.9 percent of ≤20-year-olds and 53.3 percent of >20-year-olds).

The Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology study, which was supported by La Roche-Posay Dermatological Laboratories, also showed that acne relapses are significantly associated with impaired quality of life, as well as with productivity loss and absenteeism from work or school. In Metropolitan France, for example, the number of days lost due to acne relapses would total 350,000 days per year.

"This is the very first time we are able to demonstrate the impact of acne relapses on productivity and absenteeism," explained senior author Dr. Charles Taieb, of the European Market Maintenance Assessment (EMMA), in France.
-end-


Wiley

Related Acne Articles from Brightsurf:

It cures acne, afib, anxiety? CBD users think its real medicine, contrary to evidence
A new study published in JAMA Network Open finds that as many as 90 percent of CBD users think it's real medicine, taking CBD to treat nearly all medical conditions, including substance use withdrawal, atrial fibrillation, and erectile dysfunction, to name a few.

Fighting cardiovascular disease with acne drug
Researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg and Stanford University have found the cause of dilated cardiomyopathy - a leading cause of heart failure - and identified a potential treatment for it: a drug already used to treat acne.

Anatomy of an acne treatment
Sarecycline, a drug approved for use in the United States in 2018, is the first new antibiotic approved to treat acne in more than 40 years.

Probiotics may help treat acne
Acne is caused by chronic inflammation and is often treated with antibiotics.

Doctors urged to reconsider controversial acne drug
Acne treatment including the highly effective acne medication isotretinoin should be made more readily available despite reports of its association with depression and teen suicide, a study recommends.

Are there racial/ethnic disparities in treatment for acne?
Whether there are differences in treatment of acne by race/ethnicity, sex and type of insurance was the focus of this observational study that analyzed treatment and prescribing patterns for acne for nearly 30,000 patients.

Does blue light therapy help acne? Efficacy and evidence is lacking
Conclusions about the effectiveness of blue light therapy for acne are limited.

Daily consumption of sweets, cakes and unhealthy foods associated with acne, study reveals
The research, presented at the 28th EADV Congress in Madrid, evaluated the exposure to different worsening factors on acne more than 6,700 participants across six countries in North America, South America and Europe.

Teenage acne may be a natural, transient inflammatory state
Adolescent acne does not always result in a pathological condition; rather, it may be a natural, transient inflammatory state occurring when the maturing facial skin is exposed to new microbes and enhanced production of an oily substance called sebum.

Microneedling improves appearance of acne scars
It turns out creating tiny injuries on your face with needles actually helps decrease the appearance of acne scars.

Read More: Acne News and Acne Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.