Nav: Home

First look: Chang'e lunar landing site

February 06, 2019

On Jan. 3, 2019, the Chinese spacecraft Chang'e 4 safely landed on the floor of the Moon's Von Kármán crater (186 kilometer diameter, 116 miles). Four weeks later (Jan. 30, 2019), as NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter approached the crater from the east, it rolled 70 degrees to the west to snap this spectacular view looking across the floor toward the west wall. Because LRO was 330 kilometers (205 miles) to the east of the landing site, the Chang'e 4 lander is only about two pixels across (bright spot between the two arrows), and the small rover is not detectable. The massive mountain range in the background is the west wall of Von Kármán crater, rising more than 3,000 meters (9,850 feet) above the floor.
-end-


NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Related Crater Articles:

Impact crater data analysis of Ryugu asteroid illuminates complicated geological history
Analysis of the impact craters on Ryugu using the spacecraft Hayabusa2's remote sensing image data has illuminated the geological history of the Near-Earth asteroid and revealed 77 craters.
Wolfe Creek Crater younger than previously thought
Wolfe Creek Crater, one of the world's largest meteorite craters, is much younger than previously thought.
Karla crater confirmed to be an impact structure
The Karla crater, one of the about 150 large impact structures on Earth, is situated near the border of the Republic of Tatarstan and Chuvash Republic, about 163 kilometers from Kazan Federal University.
ASU researchers study largest impact crater in the US, buried for 35 million years
About 35 million years ago, an asteroid hit the ocean off the East Coast of North America.
Mass anomaly detected under the moon's largest crater
A mysterious large mass of material has been discovered beneath the largest crater in our solar system -- the Moon's South Pole-Aitken basin -- and may contain metal from the asteroid that crashed into the Moon and formed the crater, according to a Baylor University study.
NASA finds possible second impact crater under Greenland ice
A NASA glaciologist has discovered a possible second impact crater buried under more than a mile of ice in northwest Greenland.
Chang'e 4 Rover comes into view
The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter got a closer look at Chang'e 4 on the lunar far side.
First look: Chang'e lunar landing site
On Jan. 30, NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter caught views of the Chinese Chang'e 4 lander on the floor of the Moon's Von Kármán crater.
Curiosity's first attempt at gravimetry advances martian geology
By cleverly repurposing a device onboard Curiosity normally used to detect the rover's movements on Mars to measure slight variations in gravitational fields instead, researchers have refined the understanding of how Gale crater and the mountain at its center formed.
Sunset crater, San Francisco volcanic field
The San Francisco Volcanic Field is a 4,700 square kilometers (1,800 square miles) area in the southern boundary of the Colorado Plateau.
More Crater News and Crater Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

In & Out Of Love
We think of love as a mysterious, unknowable force. Something that happens to us. But what if we could control it? This hour, TED speakers on whether we can decide to fall in — and out of — love. Guests include writer Mandy Len Catron, biological anthropologist Helen Fisher, musician Dessa, One Love CEO Katie Hood, and psychologist Guy Winch.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#543 Give a Nerd a Gift
Yup, you guessed it... it's Science for the People's annual holiday episode that helps you figure out what sciency books and gifts to get that special nerd on your list. Or maybe you're looking to build up your reading list for the holiday break and a geeky Christmas sweater to wear to an upcoming party. Returning are pop-science power-readers John Dupuis and Joanne Manaster to dish on the best science books they read this past year. And Rachelle Saunders and Bethany Brookshire squee in delight over some truly delightful science-themed non-book objects for those whose bookshelves are already full. Since...
Now Playing: Radiolab

An Announcement from Radiolab