Physicists find evidence of previously unseen transition in ferroelectrics

February 06, 2020

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. - In a recent study, University of Arkansas physics researchers found evidence of an inverse transition in ferroelectric ultrathin films, which could lead to advances in development of data storage, microelectronics and sensors.

"We found that a disordered labyrinthine phase transforms into the more ordered parallel-stripe structure upon raising the temperature," said Yousra Nahas, first author of the study titled "Inverse Transition of Labyrinthine Domain Patterns in Ferroelectric Thin Films," published in the journal Nature. Former and present U of A physics researchers Sergei Prokhorenko, Bin Xu, Sergey Prosandeev, and Distinguished Professor Laurent Bellaiche, along with colleagues in France, also contributed to the study.

Proposed a century ago, these types of transitions seem to contradict the fundamental law that disorder increases with temperature. They have been found in other systems such as superconductors, proteins, liquid crystals and metallic alloys. But they had not been found in ferroelectric materials, which are of interest to scientists because they possess spontaneous electrical polarization that can be reversed by the application of an electric field.

The University of Arkansas researchers were able to model the transitions using the Arkansas High Performance Computing Center, which is funded in part by the Arkansas Economic Development Commission. Researchers in France demonstrated the model's predictions through laboratory experiments.

"These findings may be put at use to leap beyond current technologies by enabling fundamentally new design principles and topologically enhanced functionalities within ferroelectric films," said Nahas.
-end-
The study was supported by grants from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the Army Research Office.

University of Arkansas

Related Data Storage Articles from Brightsurf:

Reviewing multiferroics for future, low-energy data storage
Big data and exponential demands for computations are driving an unsustainable rise in global ICT energy use.

A new ultrafast control scheme of ferromagnet for energy-efficient data storage
Using a single laser pulse that did not switch the ferrimagnetic layer, researchers demonstrated a much faster and less energy consuming switching of the ferromagnet.

Multi-state data storage leaving binary behind
Electronic data is being produced at a breath-taking rate. Around ten zettabytes (ten trillion gigabytes) of data is stored in global server farms, and that's doubling every two years.

Robust high-performance data storage through magnetic anisotropy
A technologically relevant material for HAMR data memories are thin films of iron-platinum nanograins.

Energy-saving servers: Data storage 2.0
A research team of Mainz University has developed a technique that will potentially halve the energy required to write data to servers and make it easier to construct complex server architectures.

New approach to DNA data storage makes system more dynamic, scalable
Researchers have developed a fundamentally new approach to DNA data storage systems, giving users the ability to read or modify data files without destroying them and making the systems easier to scale up for practical use.

Scientists take steps to create a 'racetrack memory,' potentially enhancing data storage
A team of scientists has taken steps to create a new form of digital data storage, a ''Racetrack Memory,'' which opens the possibility to both bolster computer power and lead to the creation of smaller, faster, and more energy efficient computer memory technologies.

Discovery offers new avenue for next-generation data storage
The demands for data storage and processing have grown exponentially as the world becomes increasingly connected, emphasizing the need for new materials capable of more efficient data storage and data processing.

Magnetic whirls in future data storage devices
Magnetic (anti)skyrmions are microscopically small whirls that are found in special classes of magnetic materials.

Laser writing enables practical flat optics and data storage in glass
Femtosecond laser machining has emerged as an attractive technology enabling appications ranging from eye surgery to direct writing in the bulk of transparent materials.

Read More: Data Storage News and Data Storage Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.