World class to second class? Confronting the risks to US science and innovation

February 07, 2012

A Research!America Discussion: "World Class to Second Class? Confronting the Risks to U.S. Science and Innovation"

WHAT: Research!America 2012 National Health Research Forum--a unique interactive gathering of top policy makers. This discussion brings together heads of federal agencies for health research, as well as nationally recognized leaders from industry, academia and patient advocacy. Two panels will each be followed by Q&A, exploring the current landscape for medical and health research and strategies for maintaining a robust R&D sector in the United States.

WHEN: Wednesday, March 14, 2012
Noon-3 p.m.
Lunch will be served at noon. Program begins at 12:30 p.m.

WHO: Moderators:

Richard Besser, MD, chief health and medical editor, ABC News
David Leonhardt, Washington bureau chief, The New York Times

Confirmed panelists:

Francis S. Collins, MD, PhD, director, National Institutes of Health
Margaret A. Hamburg, MD, commissioner, Food and Drug Administration
Carolyn M. Clancy, MD, director, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
Subra Suresh, MS, ScD, director, National Science Foundation
Thomas R. Frieden, MD, MPH, director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Nancy Brown, chief executive officer, American Heart Association
Sheri McCoy, MSc, vice chairman of the executive committee and member of the office of the chairman, Johnson & Johnson
Larry Shapiro, MD, executive vice chancellor for medical affairs and dean of the school of medicine, Washington University School of Medicine
Jack Watters, MD, vice president of external medical affairs, Pfizer Inc
John Castellani, president and chief executive officer, PhRMA
Hon. Kweisi Mfume, US representative, 1987-1996

WHERE: Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center - Pavilion Room
1300 Pennsylvania Ave., NW
Washington, DC

RSVP: Suzanne Ffolkes, 571 482 2710 or sffolkes@researchamerica.org
-end-


Research!America

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