Y-90: Are you ready? -- comprehensive liver tumor treatment course returns

February 07, 2012

Y-90: Are You Ready?--an intensive course examining radiation biology, dosimetry, radiation safety, embolotherapy and clinical office management in the use of yttrium-90 in the treatment of cancer--is being offered by the Society of Interventional Radiology Feb. 9-12 in Scottsdale, Ariz. The course is designed to provide focused educational opportunities for interventional radiologists, and SIR encourages fellows-in-training to attend. Limited spaces are still available.

Y-90: Are You Ready?--a highly-concentrated 3 ½ -day program--will ensure that attendees come away with solid tools needed to compare and contrast current device platforms, identify trends in patient selection and outcome prediction treatment algorithms, examine coiling and embolization techniques and discuss issues in postprocedural care and follow-up.

"Attendees will benefit from this challenging curriculum that includes best practices in Y-90 radiation safety and dose management and in-depth exploration of the Y-90 administration procedure," noted program coordinator Matthew S. Johnson, M.D., FSIR, professor of radiology and surgery and director of interventional oncology at Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, Ind. "These sessions include invaluable hands-on training in Y-90 administration systems, advanced microcatheterization and embolization skills pertinent to device delivery and appropriate follow-up and patient prognosis after radioembolization," said Johnson.

Besides Johnson, program coordinators include Charles W. Nutting, D.O., FSIR, Radiology Imaging Associates, Greenwood Village, Colo., and Riad Salem, M.D., MBA, FSIR, professor of radiology, medicine and surgery and director of interventional oncology at Northwestern University, Chicago, Ill.

Y-90: Are You Ready? will be held Feb. 9-12 at the FireSky Resort and Spa in Scottsdale, Ariz., which is offering discounted room rates for attendees. This meeting incorporates the requisite training and testing for official SIR validation of an interventional radiologist attendee as qualified to apply for Authorized User (AU) status for intra-arterial Y-90 in the treatment of hepatic malignancies. For more information or to register, visit http://www.sirweb.org/meetings/Y90.shtml or phone (703) 691-1805.
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About the Society of Interventional Radiology

Interventional radiologists are physicians who specialize in minimally invasive, targeted treatments. They offer the most in-depth knowledge of the least invasive treatments available coupled with diagnostic and clinical experience across all specialties. They use X-ray, MRI and other imaging to advance a catheter in the body, such as in an artery, to treat at the source of the disease internally. As the inventors of angioplasty and the catheter-delivered stent, which were first used in the legs to treat peripheral arterial disease, interventional radiologists pioneered minimally invasive modern medicine.

Today, interventional oncology is a growing specialty area of interventional radiology. Interventional radiologists can deliver treatments for cancer directly to the tumor without significant side effects or damage to nearby normal tissue.

Many conditions that once required surgery can be treated less invasively by interventional radiologists. Interventional radiology treatments offer less risk, less pain and less recovery time compared to open surgery. Visit www.SIRweb.org.

Society of Interventional Radiology

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