Video by UC Riverside lab receives honorable mention in international competition

February 07, 2014

RIVERSIDE, Calif. -- A video produced by the lab of Zhenbiao Yang, a professor of cell biology at the University of California, Riverside, has received an honorable mention in a challenge -- the highly acclaimed International Science & Engineering Visualization Challenge -- given by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the journal Science.

The competition was conducted in 2013. The winning entries are included in five categories: Photography, Illustration, Informational Poster and Graphics, Games and Apps, and Video.

The video by Yang's lab, titled "Visualizing Leaf Cells from Within," received the honorable mention in a three-way tie. A first place, honorable mention(s) and a people's choice were awarded in each of the five categories.

Video:http://youtu.be/tIc02tFoZ40

In total, 18 winners, honorable mentions and people's choice awardees were named. The challenge, in its 11th year, was created to exemplify the old axiom: a picture is worth a thousand words. It celebrates the long tradition of using various types of illustrations to communicate the complexities of science, engineering and technology for education and journalistic purposes when words aren't enough.

Yang was joined by UCR's Geoffrey J. Harlow, Shou Li, Albert C. Cruz and Jisheng Chen in producing the video.

NSF and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, which publishes Science, sponsored the awards.

Visualization challenge awardees were selected from 227 submissions from 12 countries, including entries from 17 U.S. states and Canadian territories.

A committee of staff members from Science and NSF screened the entries and sent finalists to an outside panel of experts in scientific visualization to select the winners. In addition, nearly 2,000 votes determined the public's favorite images as People's Choice awardees.

Winning entries feature the Earth and planets sitting in the crosshairs of multiple streams of solar power, a game that allows users to map the brain, wearable energy storage to power future generations of electronic clothing and other compelling visualizations.
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The University of California, Riverside is a doctoral research university, a living laboratory for groundbreaking exploration of issues critical to Inland Southern California, the state and communities around the world. Reflecting California's diverse culture, UCR's enrollment has exceeded 21,000 students. The campus opened a medical school in 2013 and has reached the heart of the Coachella Valley by way of the UCR Palm Desert Center. The campus has an annual statewide economic impact of more than $1 billion. A broadcast studio with fiber cable to the AT&T Hollywood hub is available for live or taped interviews. UCR also has ISDN for radio interviews. To learn more, call (951) UCR-NEWS.

University of California - Riverside

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