Nav: Home

A simulator allows patients to experiment how their vision will improve before surgery

February 07, 2019

The details regarding the validation of this new device are published in the latest issue of Scientific Reports.

Multifocal lenses are used in cataract surgeries - to replace the crystalline when it has lost its transparency - or to correct for presbyopia. There are different lens designs in the market, and choosing one or another depends on each patient's tolerance and preference.

"The possibility of the patient experimenting vison with a multifocal lens before the surgery is very attractive to reduce uncertainty and to manage expectations", ensures CSIC researcher Susana Marcos, who works at the Institute of Optics. Her team at the Visual Optics and Biophotonics Laboratory has spent years developing technologies of simultaneous vision simulation aiming at evaluating visual quality with new designs of multifocal lenses before they are implanted or even manufactured.

Now, they are introducing SimVis, a lightweight binocular visual simulator which is autonomous and wearable in helmets. In the article, scientists show the equivalence between the vision provided by their device and the intraocular lenses. In other words, lenses are depicted in the simulator.

A realistic experience

"Visual simulators are an ideal technique to provide patients with a new realistic experience of multifocality before the implantation of a new intraocular lens. In addition, if the simulator is miniaturized and has a more practical design than the ones currently available in the market, benefits could multiply", adds Marcos.

Researchers validated the simulator's realism in a group of patients by comparing the visual acuity obtained at different distances through a commercial trifocal lens - with focal points for close, intermediate and long focal distances - and through the same lens simulated by a spatial light modulator (another simulating technology) and by SimVis . "The response to multifocality depends on the subjects, but the real trifocal lens and the simulated one offered the same visual response through-focus in each patient", concludes CSIC researcher María Viñas, first author of the article.

The new simulator can be wirelessly controlled by a mobile application or a tablet. With this program it is possible not just controlling the device's lenses, but also to track the functional tests conducted on each patient wherever they are.

The technology developed by this group of CSIC scientists is protected by four patents - one of them received the award "Premio a la Mejor Patente del Año" from the Madrid+d Foundation - owned by CSIC, and licensed to the company 2EyesVision S.L., a spin-off founded, among others, by some of the study researchers.
-end-


Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)

Related Surgery Articles:

Bullies and their victims more likely to want plastic surgery
11.5 percent of bullying victims have extreme desire to have cosmetic surgery, as well as 3.4 percent of bullies and 8.8 percent of teenagers who both bully and are bullied -- compared with less than 1 percent of those who are unaffected by bullying.
Methadone may reduce need for opioids after surgery
Patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery who are treated with methadone during the procedure require significantly less intravenous and oral opioids to manage postoperative pain, reports a new study published in the May issue of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA).
New, persistent opioid use common after surgery
Among about 36,000 patients, approximately 6 percent continued to use opioids more than three months after their surgery, with rates not differing between major and minor surgical procedures, according to a study published by JAMA Surgery.
Refusing access to surgery recovery area at a UK hospital unless WHO Safe Surgery Checklist is fully complete
New research showing that refusal to allow surgery teams to take the patient to the recovery room after surgery unless the full WHO Safe Surgery Checklist has been complete is a highly effective way to improve use of the checklist.
Robotic surgery just got more autonomous
Putting surgery one step closer into the realm of self-driving cars and intelligent machines, researchers show for the first time that a supervised autonomous robot can successfully perform soft tissue surgery.
Ultrasonic surgery reduces pain and swelling after chin surgery
For patients undergoing plastic surgery of the chin (genioplasty), the use of ultrasonic 'piezosurgery' equipment reduces trauma, pain, and swelling, compared to traditional surgical drills, reports a study in the The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery.
Annual plastic surgery statistics reflect the changing face of plastic surgery
The annual plastic surgery procedural statistics from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS), show that in 2015 there were 15.9 million surgical and minimally invasive cosmetic procedures performed in the United States -- up 2 percent from 2014.
Orthopedic surgery simulation
A unique training simulator for orthopedic open surgery (knee reconstruction with total joint replacement) has been developed by OSSim Technologies Inc. in partnership with three University of Montreal orthopedic surgeons.
Forum on how surgery can improve healthcare in SA
A national forum on surgery and anaesthesia and how it is an indispensable part of achieving universal health coverage will take place on Dec.
Meniscus injury: Real surgery or sham surgery -- which is better for patients?
Should the non-surgical approach be preferred over surgical treatment or are there still advantages offered by surgery.

Related Surgery Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Changing The World
What does it take to change the world for the better? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on activism—what motivates it, why it matters, and how each of us can make a difference. Guests include civil rights activist Ruby Sales, labor leader and civil rights activist Dolores Huerta, author Jeremy Heimans, "craftivist" Sarah Corbett, and designer and futurist Angela Oguntala.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#521 The Curious Life of Krill
Krill may be one of the most abundant forms of life on our planet... but it turns out we don't know that much about them. For a create that underpins a massive ocean ecosystem and lives in our oceans in massive numbers, they're surprisingly difficult to study. We sit down and shine some light on these underappreciated crustaceans with Stephen Nicol, Adjunct Professor at the University of Tasmania, Scientific Advisor to the Association of Responsible Krill Harvesting Companies, and author of the book "The Curious Life of Krill: A Conservation Story from the Bottom of the World".